R. Shawn McBride Live

Posts for for October, 2017

People Know When You Dodge Their Questions

Posted on: October 31st, 2017 by R. Shawn McBride No Comments

There’s an interesting phenomenon these days. A lot of times, people will rather avoid a question than take responsibility for the answer. I see this in sales conversations, I see it in personal exchanges, and I see it elsewhere in life. What do we do as individuals to make sure that we’re doing the right things? One of the things to do is to take responsibility for the answers, good or bad. This will build trust and understanding, which will lead to sales and better long term relationships. Furthermore, people know when you’re dodging their questions.

It doesn’t take a rocket scientist to know when you ask a question and don’t get an answer back that something is missing, something is not working correctly in that relationship. What do we do? We need to make sure that we answer questions honestly and forthright, even if they’re not in our best interest because the relationship is more important than the particular answer. Maybe you lose a customer. Maybe you change a personal relationship because of an answer. Maybe you honestly don’t want to go to that concert. Maybe you don’t want to see that particular friend. By addressing it directly, you create trust and build an ongoing relationship. By dodging the question, the other person knows that you’ve avoided the issue, and they file that away. Trust is a road in the relationship that’s worth pursuing. Don’t dodge people’s questions. They know what’s going on. Make sure you answer things, even if the answer’s painful, and then move onto the next steps.

What’s been your experience with this? Have you dealt with people that dodge questions? Did it upset you? What did it do for the long term relationship? Join us in the comments below and let us know about your experience.

Make sure you download our free checklist to assess your business.

 

This posting is intended to be a tool to familiarize readers with some of the issues discussed herein.  This is not meant to be a comprehensive discussion and additional details should be discussed with your attorneys, accountants, consultants, bankers and other business planners who can provide advice for your circumstances. Each case is unique.  Past results do not guarantee future outcomes. This article should not be treated as legal advice to any person or entity. Freeimages.com/photographer  Alistair Williamson.

 

About the Author

R. Shawn McBride is the Chief Innovation Officer at McBride For Business, LLC. His signature keynote, The 3 Laws of Empowerment, gives audiences an entertaining look at how they can prepare, plan and protect themselves. You can email R. Shawn McBride or (214) 418-0258.

Check us out on the web.
Get Shawn’s latest book.
Add us on Twitter: @McBrideForBus #McbrideForBusiness #3LawsofEmpowerment
Like us on Facebook.

Number 1 Rule, Free to Owner

Posted on: October 31st, 2017 by R. Shawn McBride No Comments

R. Shawn McBride recently spoke about the principle of freeing up the business owner.

Hi everybody, Shawn here with you again talking more about another principle to embrace in our business, and, it’s freeing up the owner. I recently was at a Strategic Coach Workshop – and for those of you that aren’t familiar with Strategic Coach, I’ve been a client, they help business owners accelerate to the next level. It’s one of the many tools I use. I recommend it. If you’re interested in it, reach out to me I can get you some more information and get you passed over to the right people. It’s a quarterly workshop. You work on your business, not in your business. And it’s great. Dan Sullivan, who is the head of Strategic Coach now has 120 employees and it is a very successful organization. And his number one rule, which is free up Dan Sullivan. Allow Dan Sullivan to be himself. And we all need to think about this as business owners. It’s a wonderful tool for all of us to try to implement.

How do you free yourself up? How do you get your employees to take the things away that aren’t authentically you, that aren’t adding tons of value, and free you up so that you can be creative so that you can find new ways to address the marketplace. So that you can do the things that you’re truly great at. This is a wonderful lesson for all of us.

How do we free ourselves up? And it’s an underlying principle we should have in our business. Not, how do I get more done? How do I free myself up to do the things I’m great at? How does the organization get more done by using people in their correct seats doing their correct things? But how do you get more done by freeing yourself up? Think about it. Embrace it. It will make a huge difference.

If this is resonating with you check out the McBride for Business Blog  and the McBride Attorneys Blog. McBride For Business YouTube Channel has lots of videos like this. We’ll help you think about your business, come at you regularly, keep you thinking bigger and doing more. So subscribe there. And the R. Shawn McBride fans and audiences page is on Facebook. It’s geared to business owners like you with videos and contents and a community. Get yourself, get your good business friends involved. Let’s build this team and community and let’s all work together. Let me know how I can help you.

Get your free evaluation checklist at McBride for Business. Let me know if I can come out and work with you one on one. We can do some coaching. We can get a group thing going. We can do a conference or event. A lot of ideas here, really, I’m here to help and serve teams. Let me know what makes sense. My team is standing by to help you so just reach out to us. We’ll see what we can put together to really boost your organization and your business to the next level. Build that company that stands the test of time and gets you on your plan. I’m R. Shawn McBride. Let me know how I can help you. Talk to you soon.

Make sure you download our free checklist to assess your business.

 

This posting is intended to be a tool to familiarize readers with some of the issues discussed herein.  This is not meant to be a comprehensive discussion and additional details should be discussed with your attorneys, accountants, consultants, bankers and other business planners who can provide advice for your circumstances. Each case is unique.  Past results do not guarantee future outcomes. This article should not be treated as legal advice to any person or entity. Freeimages.com/photographer  John Boyer. 

 

About the Author

R. Shawn McBride is the Chief Innovation Officer at McBride For Business, LLC. His signature keynote, The 3 Laws of Empowerment, gives audiences an entertaining look at how they can prepare, plan and protect themselves. You can email R. Shawn McBride or (214) 418-0258.

Check us out on the web.
Get Shawn’s latest book.
Add us on Twitter: @McBrideForBus #McbrideForBusiness #3LawsofEmpowerment
Like us on Facebook.

 

Don’t Stop Thinking About Tomorrow

Posted on: October 30th, 2017 by R. Shawn McBride No Comments

Are you thinking about tomorrow, or are you just trying to get through today? At McBride for Business, we talk about analyzing trends and figuring out what is going right and wrong. We try to figure out the difference between successful companies and not-successful companies. As we said before, the differences are subtle, but they can be very clear.

One of the themes we see with the successful companies is that they are looking beyond today. They are looking for tomorrow’s trends, how they can better service their clients, what the economy is doing, how technology is changing things, and what role they are going to play in the long- term economy. In other words, how they can evolve. The less-than-successful companies are focused on getting the customers out the door. They are focused on the process and procedure, the here and now. They are not thinking about the future or how things should be or how things should evolve.

Kodak is the most extreme example, as we discussed in a prior blog. Kodak was so focused on doing what they had always done, making traditional cameras and film, that they were not looking to tomorrow. They did not realize that digital would change the world and would eliminate the demand for their products—their source of profit for over 100 years.

How are you looking forward in your company? Are you looking to the future, or only looking at today and how to make the current problems go away? Think big. Evolve, or else the world is going to evolve and you are not going to keep up.

Make sure you download our free checklist to assess your business.

 

This posting is intended to be a tool to familiarize readers with some of the issues discussed herein.  This is not meant to be a comprehensive discussion and additional details should be discussed with your attorneys, accountants, consultants, bankers and other business planners who can provide advice for your circumstances. Each case is unique.  Past results do not guarantee future outcomes. This article should not be treated as legal advice to any person or entity. Freeimages.com/photographer Valentina Degiorgis. 

 

About the Author

R. Shawn McBride is the Chief Innovation Officer at McBride For Business, LLC. His signature keynote, The 3 Laws of Empowerment, gives audiences an entertaining look at how they can prepare, plan and protect themselves. You can email R. Shawn McBride or (214) 418-0258.

Check us out on the web.
Get Shawn’s latest book.
Add us on Twitter: @McBrideForBus #McbrideForBusiness #3LawsofEmpowerment
Like us on Facebook.

 

 

In a Way, a Partnership is Like a Marriage

Posted on: October 30th, 2017 by R. Shawn McBride No Comments

Because I deal with partnerships all the time, people will bring me their partnership stories and analogies. They tell me what they think about partnerships, what their opinions are on partnerships, and what their theories and postulates are on partnerships. I have come to believe that a partnership is a contract, a lot like a marriage. It is a business marriage. You are getting together with somebody to have a common purpose. In a regular marriage, you are contracting to share lives, to have social times together, to do something bigger than yourselves. In a partnership marriage, the goal is to join together to have an economic synergy, to accomplish business objectives, and to do things together. Like a marriage, you are working together. You are bound to each other. You do not know what the future is, yet you have made a commitment to do this together, themes that are very similar to a marriage.

There are also challenges in a partnership–much like a marriage. How do you accomplish these things together? How do you deal with adversity or with real problems that might crop up along the way? Of course, you do not have some of the benefits you typically do with a marriage, such as the social benefits and the personal benefits. A partnership is all business, all the time.

Build your partnership correctly. Have the right people involved and the right philosophy. Make sure you are working as a team, and make sure the economic rewards and the cooperation are good so that it makes sense for you to continue to be together. Unlike a marriage with that social tie and bond, a partnership does not have that. Know that partnerships can change and evolve. People can and will come and go from partnerships, so make sure that you are working well as a team, and that you have strong communication and strong reasons to work together.

How are you making your partnership work together? How are you making sure you succeed? Join us in the comments below and let us know.

Make sure you download our free checklist to assess your business.

 

This posting is intended to be a tool to familiarize readers with some of the issues discussed herein.  This is not meant to be a comprehensive discussion and additional details should be discussed with your attorneys, accountants, consultants, bankers and other business planners who can provide advice for your circumstances. Each case is unique.  Past results do not guarantee future outcomes. This article should not be treated as legal advice to any person or entity. Freeimages.com/photographer John Frenzel.

 

About the Author

R. Shawn McBride is the Chief Innovation Officer at McBride For Business, LLC. His signature keynote, The 3 Laws of Empowerment, gives audiences an entertaining look at how they can prepare, plan and protect themselves. You can email R. Shawn McBride or (214) 418-0258.

Check us out on the web.
Get Shawn’s latest book.
Add us on Twitter: @McBrideForBus #McbrideForBusiness #3LawsofEmpowerment
Like us on Facebook.

 

 

 

 

Why I Do Things the Way the Client Wants

Posted on: October 28th, 2017 by R. Shawn McBride No Comments

You know, it’s probably not shocking, but being in a client service business, I try to do things the way the client wants. It leads to more business and it leads to a better connection with the client. So many of us are caught up on a particular way of doing things and it’s great to have processes and procedures in your business as we discussed. But it is good to offer your clients flexibility, understanding and the ability to service their dreams.

That’s why I do what the client wants. Sometimes this can look like a challenge. Sometimes the client has a different vision of what they want me doing versus what I think I should be doing. That’s okay. The two of them don’t always have to be exactly the same. For instance, I recently had a client at my law firm, www.mcbrideattorney.com who brought in a lawyer to do a lot of the work that I was previously doing. This is not the first time this has happened. Every time, rather than whine and complain, or saying oh I lost that client, I worked with the new lawyer inside the client. We build a team. We create synergy. We do more business together because now, two are better than one.

It really becomes a partnership like we’ve discussed in other blogs. It can be a cooperative environment. I could take the short view. I could worry about myself and what’s in my best interest, but I don’t. I worry about what’s best for the client. There’s a reason why the client’s doing things the way they are and I support and embrace that. By doing that, I’m supporting and embracing myself and my future and the things I want to accomplish.

What’s been your experience? Have you had to do things differently because of your client’s wants or needs? How did it impact you? What benefits from it did you see? Join us in the comments below and let us know your thoughts and experience.

Make sure you download our free checklist to assess your business.

This posting is intended to be a tool to familiarize readers with some of the issues discussed herein.  This is not meant to be a comprehensive discussion and additional details should be discussed with your attorneys, accountants, consultants, bankers and other business planners who can provide advice for your circumstances. Each case is unique.  Past results do not guarantee future outcomes. This article should not be treated as legal advice to any person or entity. Freeimages.com/photographer Ulrik De Wachter. 

About the Author

R. Shawn McBride is the Chief Innovation Officer at McBride For Business, LLC. His signature keynote, The 3 Laws of Empowerment, gives audiences an entertaining look at how they can prepare, plan and protect themselves. You can email R. Shawn McBride or (214) 418-0258.

Check us out on the web.
Get Shawn’s latest book.
Add us on Twitter: @McBrideForBus #McbrideForBusiness #3LawsofEmpowerment
Like us on Facebook.

 

 

Negotiations with Clients

Posted on: October 27th, 2017 by R. Shawn McBride No Comments

We have discussed in earlier blogs about understanding the needs and wants of the other parties, and how to build a negotiation strategy so that both parties are satisfied and achieve their goals. I have spoken about negotiations at www.rshawnmcbridelive.com.

Sometimes clients will have a surprisingly emotional reaction to your negotiations. When this happens, it is more often about them than it is about you. It is not necessarily what you said, but rather something going on with them. If you won’t take their offer, and that upsets them, it is probably because they need it and expect it. Perhaps, in the past, people have taken their offers without question. Spend less energy thinking about their reactions or behavior, and collect information about what they need and their future plans.

Likewise, on the other side of what clients need and expect, what they do in a negotiation is not about you. You may make a perfect offer but have the wrong timing for that particular prospect.  You may be offering a product that is great for one prospect, but bad for another, so be careful not to put too much into individual thoughts and reactions, and “yes or no” answers. Look at things from a global perspective. What does each thing mean? How does it all interconnect? Where are you going as a totality? When you start thinking globally and step back, you will get a better perspective and you will negotiate better.

Remember, how the other party is negotiating is not about you. It is about them and their needs and where they are. Let them be themselves.

What has been your experience with this? Have you had wild, unexpected reactions in your negotiations? How have you dealt with it? Join us in the comments below and let us know.

 

Make sure you download our free checklist to assess your business.

 

This posting is intended to be a tool to familiarize readers with some of the issues discussed herein.  This is not meant to be a comprehensive discussion and additional details should be discussed with your attorneys, accountants, consultants, bankers and other business planners who can provide advice for your circumstances. Each case is unique.  Past results do not guarantee future outcomes. This article should not be treated as legal advice to any person or entity. Freeimages.com/photographer Melissa Ricquler.

 

About the Author

R. Shawn McBride is the Chief Innovation Officer at McBride For Business, LLC. His signature keynote, The 3 Laws of Empowerment, gives audiences an entertaining look at how they can prepare, plan and protect themselves. You can email R. Shawn McBride or (214) 418-0258.

Check us out on the web.
Get Shawn’s latest book.
Add us on Twitter: @McBrideForBus #McbrideForBusiness #3LawsofEmpowerment
Like us on Facebook.

 

 

 

 

Are You Waiting for Permission From Others

Posted on: October 27th, 2017 by R. Shawn McBride No Comments

R. Shawn McBride recently spoke about not waiting for permission from others and use your instincts.

Hey folks, Shawn here with you. I have an important question for you. Are you waiting for permission from others? Stop. Think. Are you doing what is best for you? Are you doing what’s right for you and your future? Or are you waiting for permission from others? Are you seizing the opportunities that you see in front of you and that you know you should take? Or, are you waiting for others to say it’s okay? I think a lot of entrepreneurs fall into this trap. I know I have in the past, and I know it’s something I need to constantly think about because I need to be true to my entrepreneurial energy. I need to do those things I believe in. Those things I know will work because I have good instincts. And over time, I’ve learned that instincts are good. And I know what will be accepted by the market and what people need. And if I listen to those instincts, I’m able to do great things. But if I wait for others to endorse it or to approve it, they don’t see the things I see. They don’t know the things I know, and from talking to other entrepreneurs I see other people make this mistake too. So I want to wake up your thinking.

Are you stopping and waiting for permission from others? Or are you truly doing the things you need to do, that you believe in? Are you following your passion? Are you following your insights and your heart? Or are you sitting there waiting, cowering for others?

One of the reasons we’re entrepreneurs and one of the reasons we add tremendous value, is we see things that others don’t see. We do things in our business that others are afraid to do. We go in strong directions. You know, we go and open a new line of business when other people don’t see that possibility there.

We learn and get constant feedback. We get this information other people don’t have because we experiment and we test. Are you waiting for permission for others, or are you stepping out? Test every decision that you have against that metric. Think about that constantly. Do you have a friend that struggles with this? Are you watching another business, waiting for permission from others when they should be acting? Send them this video, challenge them. Tell them to step up their game.

Like our YouTube channel, McBride For Business, you get more videos like this and more thoughts about how to execute plans in your business to make your successful private business stand the test of time. Check out the R. Shawn McBride fans and audiences page on Facebook, join our community, be part of our team. We’re building more. The McBride for Business Blog has lots of great info for you.

If you need some coaching, if you need someone to come in and do a keynote, if you need some training, reach out to me. I want to build something that’s going to be customized and that will meet you and your group’s needs. You let me know what you need and I’ll help you. I’m R. Shawn McBride, I’m signing off for now, but I will be talking with you very soon.

Make sure you download our free checklist to assess your business.

 

This posting is intended to be a tool to familiarize readers with some of the issues discussed herein.  This is not meant to be a comprehensive discussion and additional details should be discussed with your attorneys, accountants, consultants, bankers and other business planners who can provide advice for your circumstances. Each case is unique.  Past results do not guarantee future outcomes. This article should not be treated as legal advice to any person or entity. Freeimages.com/photographer Alvaro Prieto.

 

About the Author

R. Shawn McBride is the Chief Innovation Officer at McBride For Business, LLC. His signature keynote, The 3 Laws of Empowerment, gives audiences an entertaining look at how they can prepare, plan and protect themselves. You can email R. Shawn McBride or (214) 418-0258.

Check us out on the web.
Get Shawn’s latest book.
Add us on Twitter: @McBrideForBus #McbrideForBusiness #3LawsofEmpowerment
Like us on Facebook.

 

 

3 Hours VS. 300 Hours

Posted on: October 26th, 2017 by R. Shawn McBride No Comments

R. Shawn McBride recently spoke about working up front with only 3 hours instead of taking 300 hours later.

Hey folks, Shawn here, asking you an important question. Would you rather hire a lawyer for 3 hours or 300 hours? Most people would easily say the three hours. And that’s the clear choice.

You know, a lot of times people ask why documentation takes a long time. Why does it take time to write a partnership agreement? Why does it take so long to work through a buy/sell provision? Why do we do dispute resolution provisions? Well, you know what? Having the right provision can be the difference between spending three hours or 300 hours.

Three hours on the front to really carefully document and get it right, or 300 hours to litigate and work through it. Obviously, most people are going to want to spend the three hours rather than 300. But, that’s what your good, careful lawyer’s probably doing. They’re working through documents and they’re making sure they’re closing loopholes and contingencies, and avoiding problems. That’s why you want to work with somebody you trust. Somebody you believe in that knows how to do the things the right way because you want to save that 300 hours on the back end. You don’t want to end up in litigation over documents that were not carefully drafted that didn’t anticipate routine issues.

Nobody can guarantee you that you’ll get every issue. Nobody can guarantee they’re going to write the perfect contract. But a good, experienced lawyer will hit on key issues that they discuss with you. Maybe you don’t want to spend the time on it. But, at least understand what your risks are, understand what you’re doing, understand that difference between 3 hours vs. 300 hours.

Is this something resonating with you? Check out the McBride Attorney’s blog and the McBride for Business blog. The McBride for Business YouTube channel has lots of great content for business owners like you. And, check out the R. Shawn McBride fans and audience pages. Become part of our community. Check out lots of great videos there.

There’s a Business Valuation Check List for you to help get your valuation higher at mcbrideforbusiness.com. Get that and let me know how I can help you. Send me a message. Let me know what you’re wrestling with, let me know what your group or organization needs, let’s see if we can come up with something that solves their needs. I’m R. Shawn McBride, signing off, talk to you very soon.

Make sure you download our free checklist to assess your business.

 

This posting is intended to be a tool to familiarize readers with some of the issues discussed herein.  This is not meant to be a comprehensive discussion and additional details should be discussed with your attorneys, accountants, consultants, bankers and other business planners who can provide advice for your circumstances. Each case is unique.  Past results do not guarantee future outcomes. This article should not be treated as legal advice to any person or entity. Freeimages.com/photographer Elizabeth French. 

 

About the Author

R. Shawn McBride is the Chief Innovation Officer at McBride For Business, LLC. His signature keynote, The 3 Laws of Empowerment, gives audiences an entertaining look at how they can prepare, plan and protect themselves. You can email R. Shawn McBride or (214) 418-0258.

Check us out on the web.
Get Shawn’s latest book.
Add us on Twitter: @McBrideForBus #McbrideForBusiness #3LawsofEmpowerment
Like us on Facebook.

 

 

Partnerships are Often for a Season

Posted on: October 26th, 2017 by R. Shawn McBride No Comments

One reason a lot of people are scared of partnerships is that they invest in them and they believe they’re going to last forever, but let me tell you, a business partnership is not a marriage. Typically, you don’t want to agree to be with somebody forever. You want to agree to be with them for a particular strategic opportunity that you’re filling together. Sometimes that is a longer term relationship.

Perhaps you’re building a business that’s going to last several decades. We’ve certainly seen clients that have successful businesses like this, but many times, you’re just capitalizing on an opportunity. You don’t want to be connected socially or deeply economically. You want to really work together to capitalize on each other’s abilities and make a business deal. That’s why we should often understand that partnerships are for a season. They last a period of time with a beginning and an end, and then everybody goes back to what they’re doing. One person has referred to this as being the Hollywood Model. Actors work together closely with directors, with film crews, with each other, produce a particular film or product, and then they go separate ways. They may work together in the future or they may not, but during the period they’re working together, they are deeply ingrained in extracting economic value and helping each other accomplish their goals. They also have their separate existence and their separate world.

The same can be structured in business partnerships. You can have a separate business and a separate partnership and go your different ways at the end of the season. Everybody wins. By coming into this realistic view of now and the future, you’re able to do more, you’re able to help each other more, and to have better feelings about now and the future. You can structure partnership agreements that really reflect your understanding. By taking this attitude, you also minimize your risk. No longer are you putting all of your eggs into one partnership basket, but you are building your skills and abilities and utilizing the partnership model to monetize it. A lot of great opportunities here.

What’s been your experience with this? Do you see partnerships for a season? Have you taken this view towards your partnerships now and in the past? What’s been your experience? Join us in the comments below and let us know how you deal with partnerships.

Make sure you download our free checklist to assess your business.

This posting is intended to be a tool to familiarize readers with some of the issues discussed herein.  This is not meant to be a comprehensive discussion and additional details should be discussed with your attorneys, accountants, consultants, bankers and other business planners who can provide advice for your circumstances. Each case is unique.  Past results do not guarantee future outcomes. This article should not be treated as legal advice to any person or entity. Freeimages.com/photographer Henning W. Smith. 

 

About the Author

R. Shawn McBride is the Chief Innovation Officer at McBride For Business, LLC. His signature keynote, The 3 Laws of Empowerment, gives audiences an entertaining look at how they can prepare, plan and protect themselves. You can email R. Shawn McBride or (214) 418-0258.

Check us out on the web.
Get Shawn’s latest book.
Add us on Twitter: @McBrideForBus #McbrideForBusiness #3LawsofEmpowerment
Like us on Facebook.

 

 

Don’t Let The Winds Just Push You From Place to Place

Posted on: October 25th, 2017 by R. Shawn McBride No Comments

If you’ve been following my blog, you know what I often talk about 10-year visions and having a strong idea of where you want to be and what you want your life to look like in a very holistic sense. This includes business, your personal life, the time you’re spending, where you live, and how all your pieces fit together. I believe it’s very important that we have these types of visions that we’re executing on to get to where we’re going, but one mistake I see a lot of people making is they do planning in very short increments. Two to three-year plans seem to be very common because two to three years is very visible. You can see where you are now and you can see where you want to be in two to three years. The temptation for planning for such horizons is large. It’s easier, it’s more visible, and it’s sufficient. It may not be great, but it’s sufficient. It gets you your next paycheck.

What happens when you do planning over a 10 or 15-year horizon, and only looking forward to the next two to three years? What happens at the end of 10 to 15 years? It’ll be much like setting out to sail across the Atlantic Ocean and looking two to three days ahead and figuring out where you could most easily get to, and then looking another two to three days ahead and figuring out where you could most easily get to, and then looking another two to three days ahead to see where you could most easily get to. You can see if you were operating a ship and doing planning on two to three days at a time, you might capture great winds, you might make great time, and you might get somewhere quickly, but the question is, is that where you want to go? Was that the right path? You’re going to end up in a lot of random places. You may end up 500 or 1,000 miles from where you intended to be.

The same thing can happen in business. A lot of times businesses plan two years ahead and capture the immediate opportunities that are available, and then plan another two years ahead and capture the opportunities available. The problem with this strategy is, much like that sailor who’s a passenger with currents and weather conditions, you become a passenger to your customers, your vendors, economic conditions, and opportunities that others are selecting for you. This is not a way to run a business. You really want to know where you’re going and have a lot of intentionality of getting there. We as business owners have a lot of control over our lives and our futures. It’s our job to direct them because if we don’t direct them, they will direct us. Many of us left the corporate world or other opportunities to control our own destiny and to go where we’re going. If you’re not working a 10-year vision, you’re not getting where you want to go, you’re not accomplishing what you need to accomplish.

What will you do differently? How will you build your skills and abilities? How will you capitalize on having a long term vision that you can execute upon?

Join us in the comments below and let us know what your experience has been. Have you ever got caught up in short term planning that has had bad, long term effects? Let us know what your thoughts and experience have been.

 

Make sure you download our free checklist to assess your business.  

This posting is intended to be a tool to familiarize readers with some of the issues discussed herein.  This is not meant to be a comprehensive discussion and additional details should be discussed with your attorneys, accountants, consultants, bankers and other business planners who can provide advice for your circumstances. Each case is unique.  Past results do not guarantee future outcomes. This article should not be treated as legal advice to any person or entity. Freeimages.com/photographer Julie Tijerina.

 

About the Author

R. Shawn McBride is the Chief Innovation Officer at McBride For Business, LLC. His signature keynote, The 3 Laws of Empowerment, gives audiences an entertaining look at how they can prepare, plan and protect themselves. You can email R. Shawn McBride or (214) 418-0258.

Check us out on the web.
Get Shawn’s latest book.
Add us on Twitter: @McBrideForBus #McbrideForBusiness #3LawsofEmpowerment
Like us on Facebook.

 

 

 

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