R. Shawn McBride Live

Posts for for January, 2017

Picking Your Business Partner: Three Critical Things to Think About

Posted on: January 19th, 2017 by R. Shawn McBride No Comments

I recently received a call from a business partner that was leaving the business. They were having some difficulty with their partner, which brings us back to the importance of picking your business partner. As we’ve discussed previously, picking your business partner is critical. Having a great business partner can be a wonderful opportunity to create value for a business for so many reasons. You have to have the right business partner, and you have to lay the foundation. I talk in The Three Laws of Empowerment about the power of planning, and how the correct planning can empower you (www.RShawnMcbrideLive.com ). When you’re laying a plan with a business partner, there’s some key things you should always be looking at.

 

#1 You need to have a clear understanding of your business. You need to understand what the business is, what you’re each going to do, and how your business philosophies are going to work together (whether they’re the same or different), and how you’re going to deal with the differences. If you’re working with your business partner and you haven’t had enough discussions to figure out where your differences are, you haven’t had enough discussions.

#2 The devil is in the details. There’s often details that you’re not thinking about, which are going to cause tension and problems. This is where you want to spend your time. You want to make sure you have a comprehensive business plan with your partner, because problems are going to come out of details you didn’t even think about. You’re going to have different ways of doing things, which are going to expose themselves, and cause a lot of tension later in the business.

#3 You have to have an out. Regardless of how comprehensive you think your plan is, or regardless of how wonderful you think your business partner is you have to have a way to exit. You have to have a way to part ways if something changes, or if you find something out that you weren’t anticipating. Merely having the exit strategy will make it more likely for you and your business partner to continue to work together.

 

Business partnerships can create a lot of value, but they need to be carefully built from the beginning. The most successful partnerships all have elements of planning and understanding early in the process.

What’s been your thought on business partnerships? Have you been part of one in the past? What have you learned about business partnerships? Share your comments below.

 

Make sure you download our free checklist to assess your business:  www.mcbrideforbusiness.com/BlogGift

 

This posting is intended to be a tool to familiarize readers with some of the issues discussed herein.  This is not meant to be a comprehensive discussion and additional details should be discussed with your attorneys, accountants, consultants, bankers and other business planners who can provide advice for your circumstances.  This article should not be treated as legal advice to any person or entity. Freeimages.com/photographer Se hui kim.

 

About the Author

Shawn McBride is the Chief Innovation Officer at McBride For Business, LLC. His signature keynote, The 3 Laws of Empowerment (www.rshawnmcbridelive.com), gives audiences an entertaining look at how they can prepare, plan and protect themselves. You can reach R. Shawn McBride at info@mcbrideforbusiness.com or (214) 418-0258.

 

Check us out on the web at www.mcbrideforbusiness.com , www.rshawnmcbridelive.com

Get Shawn’s latest book: www.mcbridebook.com

Add us on Twitter: @McBrideForBus #McbrideForBusiness #3LawsofEmpowerment

#PickingBusinessPartner  #ExitStrategy

Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/mcbrideforbusiness/?fref=ts

 

 

Stand Your Ground, Know Your Value: 4 Things to Think About

Posted on: January 18th, 2017 by R. Shawn McBride No Comments

There are four things to consider when your value’s being questioned. One frequent challenge as a professional is others will question your advice and sometimes they are professionals, too. You just need to know this is part of the process. Here’s four things to consider when someone else questions you.

 

#1 You know it. You’re an expert. You’re hired for a reason. People are looking to you for your expertise. Don’t worry about what everybody else is thinking, because you know the value and you know why you reached the decisions that you did.

#2 There will be different opinions. Rarely are there things in life that are clearly black and white. Almost always there will be different opinions on different matters, so make sure you understand that. Know that you’re standing in your value, and that your opinion is valuable.

#3 Your experience is valuable. The reason why you’re being hired, the reason why you’re giving professional advice is because you are experienced. Stand in that value, know that your client values your input, and your point of view.

#4 There rarely is one right way. There’s many different ways to get where you’re going, and your client understands that. You’re providing your best opinion on the right way to do things. Understand that process, and know that your opinion is the one that you think is right, and you know why you’re doing it.

 

We as professionals need to stand in our value and know that we have made important decisions for the reasons we have based on a whole lifetime of experience, training, and knowledge, and that we have our client’s best interest at heart. We know the right way, and when others question it, we need to trust our own instincts.

 

What’s been your experience? Have you been questioned by others? What struggles have you had in this area? Join us in the comments below.

 

Make sure you download our free checklist to assess your business:  www.mcbrideforbusiness.com/BlogGift

 

This posting is intended to be a tool to familiarize readers with some of the issues discussed herein.  This is not meant to be a comprehensive discussion and additional details should be discussed with your attorneys, accountants, consultants, bankers and other business planners who can provide advice for your circumstances.  This article should not be treated as legal advice to any person or entity. Freeimages.com/photographer typofi.

 

About the Author

Shawn McBride is the Chief Innovation Officer at McBride For Business, LLC. His signature keynote, The 3 Laws of Empowerment ( www.rshawnmcbridelive.com ), gives audiences an entertaining look at how they can prepare, plan and protect themselves. You can reach R. Shawn McBride at info@mcbrideforbusiness.com or (214) 418-0258.

 

Check us out on the web at www.mcbrideforbusiness.com , www.rshawnmcbridelive.com

Get Shawn’s latest book: www.mcbridebook.com

Add us on Twitter: @McBrideForBus #McbrideForBusiness #3LawsofEmpowerment  #StandYourGround  #ExperienceIsValuable

Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/mcbrideforbusiness/?fref=ts

 

 

What to do When a Vendor Goes Out of Business

Posted on: January 16th, 2017 by R. Shawn McBride No Comments

You’re planning your big event, you’re getting ready to host everybody and you find out one of your vendors went out of business. Or maybe they just don’t want to show up. They’ve decided that they’re busy and they can’t help you. What do you do at this point?

At this point it’s really about contingency planning. It’s really about figuring out what you can do next. You’re going to be scrambling, calling for other vendors in town, looking to find the next person who can help you. Let’s back up. Let’s think about some things we can do to avoid getting in the situation in the first place. Then we’ll look at what we can do in a specific situation.

 

#1 Review the financials. Anytime you have a vendor involved, you want to look at how financially stable they are. You may actually want to look at their financial statements, or at least want to have discussions with them about how sound they are, how long they’ve been in business, and how they’re financed.

#2 You want to make low down payments. When you make down payments to your vendors, that money is basically gone. If the vendor doesn’t perform, you may have a hard time chasing that money back, even though you may be legally entitled to get it back.  So put less down to motivate the vendor to show up and do their job.

#3 Have a backup ready. You want to know who you’re going to go to in the event that the vendor doesn’t perform. You probably interviewed multiple people before you decided on a particular vendor. Keep the contact information of the others. You may actually want to have a discussion with them about being a backup.

#4 Insurance. Insurance may be a great avenue. If you require the vendor to have insurance and include you in the coverage, you may be able to go after the insurance company in the event the vendor doesn’t perform. Or you may be able to buy your own insurance.

#5 Bonding. You want to make sure your vendor is bonded, so that you have a bond to go after.

#6 You can go in the bankruptcy line. Make sure that you file your paperwork with the bankruptcy court, etc., to make sure you get your money. This is your last-ditch effort.

 

The key to all of this is to try to avoid the situation. Once the situation has happened, your best hope is that you made a low-down payment, and you have a backup list that’s sufficient, and you can call one of your backups and get somebody in there. We recommend, for any of these situations, having a full list of all the different people you might need to call in the event of uncertainty, or if something unusual happens. Have that list on standby, to be on the safe side. If something starts to happen, if you start to see a problem, start working the phone, immediately.

What has happened to you, concerning vendors? How did you handle it? We would love to hear from you in the comment section.

 

Make sure you download our free checklist to assess your business:  www.mcbrideforbusiness.com/BlogGift

 

This posting is intended to be a tool to familiarize readers with some of the issues discussed herein.  This is not meant to be a comprehensive discussion and additional details should be discussed with your attorneys, accountants, consultants, bankers and other business planners who can provide advice for your circumstances.  This article should not be treated as legal advice to any person or entity. Freeimages.com/photographer Ricardo Santeugini.

 

About the Author

Shawn McBride is the Chief Innovation Officer at McBride For Business, LLC. His signature keynote, The 3 Laws of Empowerment ( www.rshawnmcbridelive.com ), gives audiences an entertaining look at how they can prepare, plan and protect themselves. You can reach R. Shawn McBride at info@mcbrideforbusiness.com or (214) 418-0258.

Check us out on the web at www.mcbrideforbusiness.com , www.rshawnmcbridelive.com

 

Get Shawn’s latest book: www.mcbridebook.com

Add us on Twitter: @McBrideForBus #McbrideForBusiness #3LawsofEmpowerment #VendorLoss

Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/mcbrideforbusiness/?fref=ts

 

It’s Your Big Day And The Hotel Isn’t Ready, What do You Do?

Posted on: January 15th, 2017 by R. Shawn McBride No Comments

I think a lot of people in the event planning business have had the experience of being ready for a big event and finding out that the hotel didn’t meet their obligations. Maybe they offered the space to somebody else. Maybe they booked somebody else on top of you. Maybe they just are under construction and not ready. A lot of these issues can happen. What do you do? How do you avoid being stuck holding the bag?

 

#1 Look at the financials. Look at who the event host is, who has the space. Make sure they are credible. Make sure you know who they are.

#2 Repeatedly confirm. You want to keep in touch with the venue. Make sure you are checking on them. Have a full discussion with somebody on times, date and spaces to be used.

#3 Low down payment. Put as little money up front as possible. Negotiate to minimize your expenditures over time so that you’re minimizing your risk, and you have some money and financial resources to make a pivot if you have to.

#4 Have a backup ready. You probably looked at other spaces in the same location. Keep in touch with those spaces. Keep a list. Be ready to make a quick change if necessary.

#5 Have insurance. Make sure that you or the venue has insurance that can pay you in the event one of these disruptions happens.

#6 Bonding. Bonding is another way to have financial security in the event things don’t go as planned.

#7 Have an emergency budget. Make sure that you have money set aside so that if something bad happens, you can pivot and hire a new vendor.

#6 Consider using a credit card for fees. There’s a chance, if you use a credit card, that you’ll be able to use your credit card company to get those fees back.

 

These are just some tips for what you should do if you get in a situation where your hotel or venue isn’t ready. It’s all about advance planning, and covering yourself, and being ready to pivot quickly. You can’t control the actions of others, but you can be ready to do something differently.

 

What has been your experience with hotels or venues not prepared? Tell us about it in the comment section. We would love to hear from you.

 

Make sure you download our free checklist to assess your business:  www.mcbrideforbusiness.com/BlogGift

 

This posting is intended to be a tool to familiarize readers with some of the issues discussed herein.  This is not meant to be a comprehensive discussion and additional details should be discussed with your attorneys, accountants, consultants, bankers and other business planners who can provide advice for your circumstances.  This article should not be treated as legal advice to any person or entity. Freeimages.com/photographer ibon san martin.

 

About the Author

Shawn McBride is the Chief Innovation Officer at McBride For Business, LLC. His signature keynote, The 3 Laws of Empowerment ( www.rshawnmcbridelive.com ), gives audiences an entertaining look at how they can prepare, plan and protect themselves. You can reach R. Shawn McBride at info@mcbrideforbusiness.com or (214) 418-0258.

 

Check us out on the web at www.mcbrideforbusiness.com, www.rshawnmcbridelive.com

Get Shawn’s latest book: www.mcbridebook.com

Add us on Twitter: @McBrideForBus #McbrideForBusiness #3LawsofEmpowerment

#NotPreparedVenues  #NotPreparedHotels

Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/mcbrideforbusiness/?fref=ts

 

 

 

Build Your Tribe: Surprising Results of Having a Team Following

Posted on: January 13th, 2017 by R. Shawn McBride No Comments

As the R. Shawn McBride Law Firm, PLLC ( www.mcbrideattorneys.com  ) and McBride for Business, LLC ( www.mcbrideforbusiness.com ) have grown, I’ve been more and more intentional of finding people that I believe are in my tribe: business owners, supporters, others who are a match philosophically, in business philosophy and business positioning. We may all be in different businesses, but we all think of business the same way, and we’re all really part of a tribe.

I’ve been working very hard to build that tribe. There’s been a surprising result, a surprising outcome. As I’ve built that tribe around me, as I’ve done more and more to have the team that works with me, I’ve found more and more support. Recently, I had to get support for a project, so I started looking at my list of contacts. As I was scrolling through, I found a surprising number of people who were supportive of the project. I said, “That person will support me. That person will support me. That person will support me.”

What’s shocking about it is, I don’t think I would have had that level of support a few years ago. I wouldn’t have had so many people that I could have turned to and asked for support. People would not have been as willing then as they are now. Back then, I didn’t have the right tribe. I wasn’t hanging out with the people that I wanted to be around, the people that would support me and allow me to grow. As I’ve been more intentional in this effort, I’ve built a better and better team around me. I want others to hear that message.

I want others to do that – to build that team. Stick around others that are supportive of you in your business, that give you positive energy. Minimize your time with those with negative energy, those that take away from your power. Then you’ll be surprised. The day will come where you need your tribe, and your tribe will be there for you.

What have you done to build your team? What’s been your philosophy in getting the right people behind you. How have you built your business?

 

Make sure you download our free checklist to assess your business:  www.mcbrideforbusiness.com/BlogGift

 

This posting is intended to be a tool to familiarize readers with some of the issues discussed herein.  This is not meant to be a comprehensive discussion and additional details should be discussed with your attorneys, accountants, consultants, bankers and other business planners who can provide advice for your circumstances.  This article should not be treated as legal advice to any person or entity. Freeimages.com/photographer Teak Sato.

 

About the Author

Shawn McBride is the Chief Innovation Officer at McBride For Business, LLC. His signature keynote, The 3 Laws of Empowerment (www.rshawnmcbridelive.com) , gives audiences an entertaining look at how they can prepare, plan and protect themselves. You can reach R. Shawn McBride at info@mcbrideforbusiness.com or (214) 418-0258.

 

Check us out on the web at www.mcbrideforbusiness.com , www.rshawnmcbridelive.com

Get Shawn’s latest book: www.mcbridebook.com

Add us on Twitter: @McBrideForBus #McbrideForBusiness #3LawsofEmpowerment #FindingYourTribe #BuildingYourTribe

Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/mcbrideforbusiness/?fref=ts

 

 

 

Transferability of Skills: Does it Really Matter?

Posted on: January 12th, 2017 by R. Shawn McBride No Comments

We hear a lot in the marketplace about the transferability of skills. Can you move skills from one career or job to another? The real question is, does it really matter? Certainly, a lot of people focus their career, their education, and other decisions on whether their skills are transferable. There’s a good reason why. Obviously, you don’t want to spend a lot of time and energy building a skill that you can’t use somewhere else. However, I think a lot of people are surprised by the fact that skills are more transferable than you think.

I’ve worked with paralegals that were music majors. I’ve worked with people that were engineers that were building businesses. I see people with all types of skills doing all types of things. The old philosophy was you got an undergraduate education, and it was general education for life. It helped you prepare yourself, and I think interestingly, as the world becomes more and more specialized, more and more technical, it’s becoming more and more true that general skills are the key. While people are going to pay for a highly specialized or unique ability as we’ve discussed in other blogs, people want to know somebody with general skills.  The unique skills are built by people who focus in a particular area over time.

Most of the skills that we see that are highly, highly coveted and valuable that are unique, that add value, have been built outside of education, outside of a training process. A few weeks ago, I attended Heroic Public Speaking put on by Michael Port (heroicpublicspeaking.com/). Michael Port’s wife, Amy Port, talked about how she was educated in theater arts and now she teaches speakers how to speak and use those skills. She was surprised that those skills became transferable because she had found a calling.

If we aren’t intentionally building skills in a particularized area, how do we add value? How do we find our way?

I think the key is to find what you love. Find your passion. As you follow your passion, you’ll be great at it. As you’re great at it, you’ll add value. You’ll find unique things. You’ll have a different view of the world. That will add tremendous value. I think the key when you’re experiencing life and you’re growing your skill set, is to focus on what’s interesting and unique. Look for opportunities, but don’t constantly think in terms of if I do this, is it transferable? As you build a knowledge and expertise, which is highly unique and specialized, the market will develop. Focus on your love. Focus on your passion. Don’t focus on transferability.

What are your thoughts on transferability? How do you plan around transferring skills? What would you do differently? Join us in the comments below.

Make sure you download our free checklist to assess your business:  www.mcbrideforbusiness.com/BlogGift

 

This posting is intended to be a tool to familiarize readers with some of the issues discussed herein.  This is not meant to be a comprehensive discussion and additional details should be discussed with your attorneys, accountants, consultants, bankers and other business planners who can provide advice for your circumstances.  This article should not be treated as legal advice to any person or entity. Freeimages.com/photographer

About the Author

 

  • Shawn McBride is the Chief Innovation Officer at McBride For Business, LLC. His signature keynote, The 3 Laws of Empowerment (www.rshawnmcbridelive.com) , gives audiences an entertaining look at how they can prepare, plan and protect themselves. You can reach R. Shawn McBride at info@mcbrideforbusiness.com or (214) 418-0258.

 

Check us out on the web at www.mcbrideforbusiness.com  , www.rshawnmcbridelive.com

Get Shawn’s latest book: www.mcbridebook.com

Add us on Twitter: @McBrideForBus #McbrideForBusiness #3LawsofEmpowerment #TransferableSkills #PublicSpeaking @michealport

Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/mcbrideforbusiness/?fref=ts

 

Following Your Passion

Posted on: January 11th, 2017 by R. Shawn McBride No Comments

Some of our readers might be familiar with Rick Steves, the perennial show host on public television and the author of Europe Through the Back Door (https://www.ricksteves.com/). We admire Rick Steves because early in his career, he followed his passion. He had a passion for Europe and built a following of American audiences that were interested in the possibility of traveling to Europe. It’s a very nonconventional business to think about finding a passion for another region of the world and then catering to your home country and their travel to that area.

Rick Steves built a brand and a life around what he was passionate about. He sold guidebooks. He did training and education. He, of course, had his tourism company where he was able to make money off of it. He really believed in his passion and put a lot of time and energy into doing what he loves and then let the money flow back to him as his brand built and increased. These are the types of things we can do when we’re passionate and empowered. My signature talk, The 3 Laws of Empowerment (www.rshawnmcbridelive.com/3laws), talks about preparing, planning, and protecting yourself so that you can build a life that you love.

What’re your thoughts about following your dreams, about getting to the next level, about being all you want to be? Join us in the comments below.

Make sure you download our free checklist to assess your business:  www.mcbrideforbusiness.com/BlogGift

 

This posting is intended to be a tool to familiarize readers with some of the issues discussed herein.  This is not meant to be a comprehensive discussion and additional details should be discussed with your attorneys, accountants, consultants, bankers and other business planners who can provide advice for your circumstances. Each case is unique.  Past results do not guarantee future outcomes. This article should not be treated as legal advice to any person or entity. Freeimages.com/photographer Yaraslav B.

 

About the Author

Shawn McBride is the Chief Innovation Officer at McBride For Business, LLC. His signature keynote, The 3 Laws of Empowerment (www.rshawnmcbridelive.com/3laws), gives audiences an entertaining look at how they can prepare, plan and protect themselves. You can reach R. Shawn McBride at info@mcbrideforbusiness.com or (214) 418-0258.

 

Check us out on the web at www.mcbrideforbusiness.com, www.rshawnmcbridelive.com/3laws

Get Shawn’s latest book: www.mcbridebook.com

Add us on Twitter: @McBrideForBus #McbrideForBusiness #3LawsofEmpowerment

Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/mcbrideforbusiness/?fref=ts

 

 

 

Having a Board of Directors: Three Things to Consider

Posted on: January 11th, 2017 by R. Shawn McBride No Comments

Is your company using a board of directors or outside advice? If not, why not?

Why aren’t you using this valuable tool?

Here are three things to think about in response to some common objections we see to having a board of directors. This might give you reasons why you may actually want a board of directors. A lot of value can be created here.

 

#1 We are too small. A lot of companies feel like they’re too small to have a board of directors. They feel they don’t have enough operations and they’re not big enough. A properly functioning board of directors, whether it’s a formal board set up by an LLC agreement or corporation documents, or an advisory board, can provide valuable outside frames of reference, can help you look at the situations with a critical eye, and question management’s thinking. A board can also act as a networking tool to help the company know more people.

#2 We can’t afford it. A board of directors doesn’t have to be expensive. Depending on how it’s structured, a board can be set up with nominal or no payment. It’s simply a matter of putting time and effort into the structure and process.

#3 It’s too complicated. Setting up a board of directors can be very simple. It doesn’t have to be a difficult exercise. You don’t have to have the perfect board. Having a working board with a different point of view and expressing different ideas to contribute to the business can be extremely valuable. There’s lots of different ways to put the board together, and there’s no right or wrong answer.

 

We think that most companies would benefit from having a board of directors, from having that outside point of view, from having thoughts from different areas of business and having checks and balances. We don’t think there’s a time that it’s too early to do a board of directors. We think the board should probably increase in diversity and complexity with time, but a simple foundation of a board can be set-up early in the company. We think most companies would derive a lot of benefit from having alternate points of view in their business lives.

Have you used a board of directors? What’s keeping you from implementing this strategy? What are your thoughts on boards? Share with us in the comments below.

 

Make sure you download our free checklist to assess your business:  www.mcbrideforbusiness.com/BlogGift

 

This posting is intended to be a tool to familiarize readers with some of the issues discussed herein.  This is not meant to be a comprehensive discussion and additional details should be discussed with your attorneys, accountants, consultants, bankers and other business planners who can provide advice for your circumstances.  This article should not be treated as legal advice to any person or entity. Freeimages.com/photographer nick cowie.

About the Author

Shawn McBride is the Chief Innovation Officer at McBride For Business, LLC. His signature keynote, The 3 Laws of Empowerment (www.rshawnmcbridelive.com), gives audiences an entertaining look at how they can prepare, plan and protect themselves. You can reach R. Shawn McBride at info@mcbrideforbusiness.com or (214) 418-0258.

Check us out on the web at www.mcbrideforbusiness.com  , www.rshawnmcbridelive.com

Get Shawn’s latest book: www.mcbridebook.com

Add us on Twitter: @McBrideForBus #McbrideForBusiness #3LawsofEmpowerment #ChecksandBalances #BoardofDirectorsStrategy

Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/mcbrideforbusiness/?fref=ts

Empower Your Employees To Fuel Your Growth

Posted on: January 10th, 2017 by R. Shawn McBride No Comments

I believe in empowerment. I often speak about The 3 Laws of Empowerment,  (www.rshawnmcbridelive.com/3laws). I think a lot of employers are missing a great opportunity. Empowered employees and engaged employees, can do more for your business. They’ll work for you, and they’ll work harder.

Unfortunately, I found that many companies are afraid to empower their employees. They may not do the things they need to do to let those employees have the careers and the lives they love because the employer’s afraid. They’re afraid of losing the employee, and they’re afraid the employee might go a different direction, but that’s an overly simplistic view of the world.

There’s so much opportunity out there. If the employee’s engaged and working hard — working hard for themselves — they’ll do more for the employer, which will create more opportunity for everybody. It’s really a holistic view of business to allow your employees to be empowered, to allow them to do more, to allow them to be successful, but you have to have trust. You have to have trust that if you do the right things for your employees if you do the right things for them, they’ll do the right things for you. This is really about building a symbiotic relationship, about getting everybody working together.

In The Three Laws of Empowerment For High Growth Companies  (www.rshawnmcbridelive.com/3laws), I speak about getting companies to trust in their employees, to allow employees to build lives and careers they love, and as those employees build those lives and careers they love, they’ll start doing more and more for their company.  As the employee is working hard for their goals, the company goals will be met. It really is a 1 + 1 = 4 situation.

What are your thoughts on empowering your employees? Have you gone the extra mile to allow employees to do jobs they love in a way they love? Have you reached out to them to determine what their career goals are? How you are you working through the empowerment? Join us in the comments below.

Make sure you download our free checklist to assess your business:  www.mcbrideforbusiness.com/BlogGift

 

This posting is intended to be a tool to familiarize readers with some of the issues discussed herein.  This is not meant to be a comprehensive discussion and additional details should be discussed with your attorneys, accountants, consultants, bankers and other business planners who can provide advice for your circumstances. Each case is unique.  Past results do not guarantee future outcomes. This article should not be treated as legal advice to any person or entity. Freeimages.com/photographer Krzysztof Baranski.

 

About the Author

Shawn McBride is the Chief Innovation Officer at McBride For Business, LLC. His signature keynote, The 3 Laws of Empowerment (www.rshawnmcbridelive.com/3laws), gives audiences an entertaining look at how they can prepare, plan and protect themselves. You can reach R. Shawn McBride at info@mcbrideforbusiness.com or (214) 418-0258.

 

Check us out on the web at www.mcbrideforbusiness.com, www.rshawnmcbridelive.com/3laws

Get Shawn’s latest book: www.mcbridebook.com

Add us on Twitter: @McBrideForBus #McbrideForBusiness #3LawsofEmpowerment

Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/mcbrideforbusiness/?fref=ts

 

 

 

How Different Are You?

Posted on: January 10th, 2017 by R. Shawn McBride No Comments

Are you truly different? I think every business needs to ask this question: Am I truly different?

What’s my unique value proposition? What am I doing that nobody else is doing?

This has been a struggle for me and for other business owners. Early in my business when I left the big law firms and started my own law firm (www.mcbrideattorneys.com), I thought I offered something unique. I told people I was a business law firm, transactional only, focused on the private business owner. The problem was that was not truly unique. It sounded somewhat unique, but it was not truly unique, and the market knew it. We had clients. We did okay, but we weren’t truly growing because we weren’t that different. We weren’t intentionally great in a narrow area.

As time evolved, I learned more about me and my passion. Clients found me and started using me in particular areas. Then things started to emerge. It became very clear that my target was successful privately held businesses. Many companies that were just starting that had very green management teams were not a great fit. Experienced owners of businesses that could use us became a good fit. I started learning that. I also started learning where I was passionate and what I was great at such as partnership agreements, developing documents, helping people make businesses that last, that sustain and that are bigger than them. That’s where the value was.

You can see my journey to uniqueness, and I think other business owners need to have that same journey. How do you get from where you are to where you want to be? How do you find your uniqueness? How do you make your business positioned to be truly unique? Many of the most successful companies that we look at today are really good at a handful of things, one thing, or a couple of things that they do better than anybody else. They are the go-to for that.

How are you positioning yourself? What are you the go-to for? How have you built your business? Let’s discuss in the comments below.

 

Make sure you download our free checklist to assess your business:  www.mcbrideforbusiness.com/BlogGift

 

This posting is intended to be a tool to familiarize readers with some of the issues discussed herein.  This is not meant to be a comprehensive discussion and additional details should be discussed with your attorneys, accountants, consultants, bankers and other business planners who can provide advice for your circumstances.  This article should not be treated as legal advice to any person or entity. Freeimages.com/photographer Tolgar Kelleci.

 

About the Author

Shawn McBride is the Chief Innovation Officer at McBride For Business, LLC. His signature keynote, The 3 Laws of Empowerment (www.rshawnmcbridelive.com), gives audiences an entertaining look at how they can prepare, plan and protect themselves. You can reach R. Shawn McBride at info@mcbrideforbusiness.com or (214) 418-0258.

 

Check us out on the web at www.mcbrideforbusiness.com , www.rshawnmcbridelive.com

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