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Posts for for December, 2016

Seven Questions to Ask When Hiring a Speaker for Planning

Posted on: December 13th, 2016 by R. Shawn McBride No Comments

Here’s seven questions to ask when you’re considering to hire a speaker on planning for your next conference, event, or corporate training.

#1 Are they actively doing plans for their clients? There’s a benefit to experience and to working through issues with clients and to seeing the evolution of the business marketplace that is gained in actively working with clients. The world is changing so quickly around us and so many issues come up in day to day practice. Is the person you’re hiring merely a speaker or trainer or are they actually working with their client on doing plans, getting into the nitty-gritty and fully understanding the issues as they happen?

#2 Do they have strong training to back up their teachings? Does the person have the academic skill? Have they been to graduate training? Do they have an undergraduate background in this area? Have they worked in this area for years and years? What training and background does your trainer have to back up their teaching?

#3 Why did they get into this? Why is the trainer doing this? Was it an outgrowth of their business and processes or did they jump into it because they were desperate to find a way to make income? What’s the passion that underlines why they’re training your audiences?

#4 Are they still having new experiences? Is your training engaged in a process where they’re still learning and growing in this area or are they regurgitating information that they learned 20 or 30 years ago in a new form? It’s critical in this day and age that everybody stay engaged and continue learning because so much is changing. Is your trainer learning and developing or are they simply regurgitating old experience again and again?

#5 Are they purely academic? Is their advice, presentation, and training based purely on academic theory or are they engaged in the real world? Are they actually out there working with people, seeing what’s really happening and using real solutions to real problems?

#6 Can they supplement their presentation or training in different degrees? If you’re hiring somebody to come in and talk about a particular issue, there’s probably a reason. There’s probably something going on that you want to address and that’s why you’re getting value. Can your speaker or trainer supplement what they’re doing with one-on-one coaching, workshops, or other ways to deliver that material to your audience to make sure that they are being protected and that they’re getting the value they deserve?

It’s great to have a wonderful speaker, as your audience connects with them and they see the value added, can they access this information other forms, too? Can you truly get the processes and procedures implemented to make your business work better? Is this person available to help you with it?

#7 Do they offer follow-up consulting? Can they follow-up with your group? Can they help you? Are they available if needed or are they simply going to come in, give a speech, and leave?

These are seven different key factors to consider when you’re thinking about hiring a speaker on planning. Make sure you take them into account when you’re looking at your next meeting and that the person can help you in so many different ways.

What’s been your experience when hiring somebody speak on planning? Have you been disappointed by the outcomes? Have you had problems? Join us in the comments below.

It’s critical that everyone stay engaged and continue to learn.

Choosing a speaker, wisely.

Make sure you download our free checklist to assess your business:  www.mcbrideforbusiness.com/BlogGift

 

This posting is intended to be a tool to familiarize readers with some of the issues discussed herein.  This is not meant to be a comprehensive discussion and additional details should be discussed with your attorneys, accountants, consultants, bankers and other business planners who can provide advice for your circumstances. Each case is unique.  Past results do not guarantee future outcomes. This article should not be treated as legal advice to any person or entity. Freeimages.com/photographer Brad Harrison.

 

About the Author

Shawn McBride is the Chief Innovation Officer at McBride For Business, LLC. His signature keynote, The 3 Laws of Empowerment (www.rshawnmcbridelive.com), gives audiences an entertaining look at how they can prepare, plan and protect themselves. You can reach R. Shawn McBride at info@mcbrideforbusiness.com or (214) 418-0258.

 

Check us out on the web at www.mcbrideforbusiness.com, www.rshawnmcbridelive.com

Get Shawn’s latest book: www.mcbridebook.com

Add us on Twitter: @McBrideForBus #mcbrideforbusiness #3lawsofempowerment

Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/mcbrideforbusiness/?fref=ts

Grow Your Restaurant Empire From The Ground Up

Posted on: December 12th, 2016 by R. Shawn McBride No Comments

Shawn McBride interviewed TJ Topper, an entrepreneur, about his experience in the restaurant industry on November 22, 2016.

You can find the full interview here:

https://www.facebook.com/rshawnmcbride/videos/10157748259775514/

Shawn McBride: Welcome, Shawn McBride here. We’re gonna spend some time here talking to my good friend TJ Topper about the restaurant world. He spent a lot of time in that industry. Got to know a lot of people. He’s seen the ups and downs and what goes on in that space. There’s some unique things . . . it’s not the same as running a business in other places because the restaurant industry has a lot of unique challenges.

TJ, let’s start out, let’s talk a little bit about that. What have you noticed that’s a little bit different with working in the restaurant world verses the rest of the business world.

TJ:  Well it’s a good point Shawn, I mean you know really in the restaurant world, different than day to day business, there’s always a challenge and I always like to say the key to succeeding in the restaurant world is really not whether you’re going to make money that day. What you have to figure out is, why you’re not going to make money that day. Is it too nice outside, are we going into a holiday, are people on vacation, is it raining, or snowing? I mean up here in the Mid-Atlantic obviously, we deal with the colder weather, we’re getting into that season. There’s a lot of different variables that go into that, that you really have to know what you’re dealing with depending on where you’re located. Are you in a strip mall? Are you in a remote location? How is your accessibility to the public? And how will the volume be dictated by your current situation?

Shawn McBride: I think that’s been my experience when I’ve worked with people and clients in the restaurant world is, you get a lot more variability I guess than in other businesses. We all have seasonality, we have times our customers are showing up and times they’re not but in the restaurant world, it seems like people have extremes. You’ll have days where you’ll be packed and then you’ll have days when you are not having nearly as much traffic coming into your business.

TJ:  Oh absolutely, and really, it’s a daily equation that goes into that and you have to know what days are going to be busy, when are you going to be at your peak operation hours, when does your staff have to be at its maximum, when will you be at your times when you need to cut back on your staffing because your labor is obviously going to affect your bottom line, ordering your product. Keeping fresh product in the house at all times. You can’t have things go bad. There’s a lot of different equations that will go into that. You really have to know every angle of that business because there is very, very little room for error when it comes to making money in the restaurant industry and the carry out business, whatever it may be. There’s a lot of different things that go into that.

Shawn McBride: Where do people start in that process? If you’re going to start a restaurant, you’re trying to do projections, you’re trying to build a brand-new business, where do you start on knowing how to staff or how to project when you’re going to be busy and when you’re not going to be busy?

TJ:  I think a lot of that is dictated by the location . . . what kind of business you’re doing. Whether it’s going to be a 200-seat restaurant, or is it a 20-seat carry out, that might have some seating up front. That’s really going to dictate a lot of what goes into the planning, the forecasting for that kind of business. A lot of times the banks are gonna want to see, what are your projections, what’s your 6-month projection, 1 year, 2 years, 3 years? Where are you gonna be in 5 years, what’s the plan for growth? How do you deal with the slower times verses the busier times? When to spend money . . . when to hold onto money. There’s a lot of things that go into that for sure.

Shawn McBride: And you’re more than just a consultant in this case. You’ve built a couple of restaurants over the years.

TJ:  Yeah, I mean I’ve been in this industry since I was 12 years old. I started papering bushel baskets at a local seafood place here in Maryland. I know that sounds crazy, 12 years old but I was getting ready to go into high school and I wanted to work and we had family in the business, so I started working and that’s kind of where I started and I’ve been through everything from privately owned, smaller places like that to big corporations. I was with TGI Fridays for some years, probably about 5 years to be exact. Went with a privately-owned restaurant after TGI Fridays and was actually part of the opening team there. I got to see what it was like to open a privately owned multi-functional place. It was a brew pub and a restaurant, over 400 seats, so we went from working in a smaller place to a big place. They were very successful, still in business 19 years later. One of the best operators I know in the business. Learned a lot from him.

Worked with McCormick and Schmick’s in downtown Baltimore. After that, I actually opened up my own place. Had two locations with that and then most recently opened a New Market Deli and Catering company, from the table concept up in the northern Hartford County area. I’ve been around it for a long time. I’m actually now on the other side of the table of it as well with DePaul and Sons in Baltimore Maryland. We do restaurant equipment and paper chemical supplies. We design, we install restaurants pretty much from the ground up. It’s kind of nice to have both ends of the spectrum, because you see it from an operator’s standpoint. Now I’m dealing with it from the end user and being in the sales side of it. So, I bring a lot to the table when it comes to that. Because I’ve already kind of been through it on different levels.

Shawn McBride: You’ve seen some profitable restaurants over the years. It’s not that everybody who gets in there struggles. It’s a matter of building your customer base and getting the right mix of things working together.

TJ:  Oh absolutely. I’ve worked with some of the most successful restaurants in the state. I have friends that run phenomenally profitable restaurants, bars, catering companies, some of the biggest around. It’s a great business but it’s not for everybody and you really need to know what you’re getting involved with before you make a substantial investment, not only of money but of time, because this business, this is not a Monday through Friday 9-5 job. This is 7 days a week when you’re working, and when you’re not working. There’s perks to both sides of that end of the spectrum but it’s not for somebody who thinks there’re going to go in and there’re gonna open a place and within 3 months they’re gonna have somebody running it and they’re just gonna collect checks. It’s not that type of set up.

Shawn McBride: I guess that’s part of the process. If you’re going to work with the client or work with another restaurant owner trying to get to the level of success you had, your goal is to build this business to where eventually that restaurant runs itself and you can kind of think about future locations and expansion and these issues rather than more of the day to day.

TJ:  Sure, because you want to have that future growth. You want to be able to look forward . . .  what are your goals . . . what are you trying to accomplish? Is this a location deal? Are you trying to have multiple locations? Are you trying to do multiple locations with different concepts? There’s a lot of different things that you can do. The key is once you really know the business and you know how to make money, then you can take different concepts and apply them in different locations. You can apply them in different towns. I know a lot of people who have had businesses here in Baltimore that have taken them down to the beach, down to resort areas, different states . . . it doesn’t matter because once you learn it, it’s duplicatable. It is a duplicatable system and that’s important in a lot of businesses. If you can duplicate that and you can manage your time and you can manage everything that’s going on around you, (which is one of my favorite things is multi task), then you can really build a nice business.

Shawn McBride: Yeah, exactly. All right, so starting out, let’s talk realistically. A lot of my followers are successful private business owners. These are people who have done it before, often in one industry, sometimes we get people who have worked for a company for 25, 30 years, maybe an executive role, and they’ve been in the business, let’s say they’re not real familiar with the restaurant industry and they’re getting ready to take that first step. They’re saying I’ve always dreamed of having a restaurant. I think this might be the next phase for me in my business life. I want to try to apply my management skills in this new area. What would you tell them, what kind of things would you have them think about and possibly go into a new area of endeavor?

TJ:  Well the most important thing is gonna be location. You hear that in a lot of business. And location is very, very key to running a successful business because you have to be located in a place where you’re gonna be visible to the public. You’re gonna have a captured audience. Depending on the type of restaurant, or type of bar, carry out, catering, whatever you might be venturing into in this industry, location is very important. That would be the number one thing.

Shawn McBride: I’ve seen a lot of restaurants that have been located for somewhere that I guess the lease comes up for renewal and then I guess the landlord has a lot of negotiating leverage because they see a successful restaurant in there, landlord thinks well I can bring another successful restaurant in there and then pricing becomes tough. What kind of suggestions would you have for a restaurant owner as far as managing that risk or making sure that if they do find a successful location, that they have the ability to stay there to capitalize on that customer stream they’ve built?

TJ:  Well a lot of people in the beginning, they’re going to go into a lease situation where they’re gonna rent a place, they’re gonna get the business started, really see if it takes off without investing a ton of money in a property right out of the gate. That’s good and bad, obviously for what you just said, the landlord sees, oh man they’re doing a phenomenal business and they have that upper hand. Some people will say you know I signed 5-year lease with a 5-year option, you know after that 5 years, at year 4, I might be looking to buy a piece of property at this point because we’ve got an equation that’s working, we’ve built up a great business, we have a great foundation, I could move 2 miles down the street and be just as successful. But now you own that piece of property, so you’re now building not only the asset of the business but the asset of the property, so you’re not just throwing money away at renting each month. Then if something goes wrong and you gotta fix something, it’s not that big of a deal because you’re fixing your own property, which is your investment, and that becomes more when your building something, that’s a more substantial asset than just the business.

Shawn McBride: Yeah. So, you see a lot of people that will be part of your planning early on is wondering at what time are we possibly going to do these transition points. How are we gonna make this thing safer and stronger as time goes on and part of that might be moving from being a tenant to being an owner of a piece of property.

TJ:  Sure, and you see that a lot where people have gotten into a place and they’ve settled in and they either try and buy the piece of property, if that’s an option with the landlord, or they’re gonna look to move that business to their own piece of property. I’ve seen some very successful places start out in a very small location, maybe it is just a carry out with a catering as well built into that but then down the road they’re like you know, I want to expand this. I want a full- service restaurant. What we’ve got is working, we’re building, we’re increasing our volume, we need more space. Let’s find a nice place to build a place. You’ll see that a lot. You really can’t plan too far ahead, you want to get through that first 1 to 3 years really in the beginning and make sure that you’re doing the right thing and that you’re making money and you’re paying down your debt service and things of that nature. Then you can start worrying about that stuff. That’s a good problem to have.

Shawn McBride: It’s a good problem to have. What’s the key to getting to that first 1 to 3 years from your perspective? What makes a difference between that company that makes it 1 to 3 years and one that doesn’t make it 3 years?

TJ:  I think the major key is gonna be smart spending. Continuing to reinvest in your business. Continuing to advertise and build. Build that volume. Just being really conservative with what you’re doing in the day to day operations. Every dollar is important. If you’re irresponsibly spending or your buying something that you don’t necessarily need to, these things are all gonna drive down the bottom line, which makes the day to day and the month to month get a little tighter. You never know what’s gonna happen. You can have down time. You can have a string of bad weather. There’s so many different things that go into play with that. People start to make some money and then they just start to buy things. Next thing you know they’re driving a new car or they’re doing this. And sure, that can all happen in time but let’s get through the first year or second year, because once you hit that third year, that’s really when, (if you’ve made it three years in the restaurant industry), you’re doing pretty well. I’m not saying you’re going to retire after year four but the first three years are very, very crucial for sure.

Shawn McBride: You touched on advertising and promotion and getting people out to the business. What kind of tips would you have for somebody as far as just getting the name of the restaurant out there, getting that initial customer traffic, building that core client base?

TJ:  Well I’ll tell you, advertising is definitely important. Obviously now, everything’s driven by the internet. There’s a lot of good advertising companies out there that will be very beneficial to the restaurant industry. There’s a lot of things that are just so-so. Even today as much as it sounds crazy, we’ve had great success with mailers, menus that go out and some of the higher end advertising firms. They’ll put together a nice mailer for you. Those things still work. You got to remember Google, search engine optimization of the business. You’ve got to be visible on the internet. They’ve got to be able to find you. There’s plenty of good web developers out there. Even years back, I use to think it was a little far-fetched that the amount of money that you pay for some of these things, but the return on investments is what is important and there’s not a whole lot that we’ve done (advertising wise) where we haven’t seen that return on investment.

Shawn McBride: For those of you joining late, we’re visiting with TJ Topper who is a serial entrepreneur in the restaurant space and he’s sharing some tips with us on things he’s seen.

You’ve built several restaurants. What’s some things that you wish you knew sooner than later? Things that if you could go backwards and tell yourself now, what you had known when you were first getting into the industry, what would you tell yourself?

TJ:  I’ve always lived by the motto do it right the first time or don’t do it at all. I learned from my first ventures to where I am now, a lot of what I just touched on about the responsible spending, things that you have to open the doors and things that you can get a couple of months in, that aren’t necessities to get your business up and running. That’s very important. You have to be very conscience about what you’re spending money on in the beginning part of it, of the business that’s for sure.

Shawn McBride: Okay, perfect. Well thank you for being on here today. I know you’ve both worked on your restaurants and you occasionally work with restaurant owners. How can people reach out to you if they want to get a hold of you?

TJ:  They can click on the www.McBride For Business/tjtopper.com and I believe contact through that. That’s probably the best way to get me.Shawn McBride: Perfect and feel free to visit McBride For Business, we have a blog, we talk about a lot of business topics and things we see in the business world and we also have a business value check list. If you scroll through our website, you’ll see a link to download that checklist. It applies to businesses both in the restaurant industry and beyond and we welcome your calls. Feel free to reach out to us. TJ is available to help you with your restaurant needs if that’s ever something of need and I’m available as well.

Thank you for checking in with us today and we look forward to seeing you again soon. Thank you.

TJ:  Thanks Shawn.

Shawn McBride: Thanks TJ.

 

Make sure you download our free checklist to assess your business:  www.mcbrideforbusiness.com/BlogGift

 

This posting is intended to be a tool to familiarize readers with some of the issues discussed herein.  This is not meant to be a comprehensive discussion and additional details should be discussed with your attorneys, accountants, consultants, bankers and other business planners who can provide advice for your circumstances. Each case is unique.  Past results do not guarantee future outcomes. This article should not be treated as legal advice to any person or entity. Freeimages.com/photographer Pascal Thauvin.

 

About the Author

Shawn McBride is the Chief Innovation Officer at McBride For Business, LLC. His signature keynote, The 3 Laws of Empowerment (www.rshawnmcbridelive.com ), gives audiences an entertaining look at how they can prepare, plan and protect themselves. You can reach R. Shawn McBride at info@mcbrideforbusiness.com or (214) 418-0258.

 

Check us out on the web at www.mcbrideforbusiness.com , www.rshawnmcbridelive.com

Get Shawn’s latest book: www.mcbridebook.com

Add us on Twitter: @McBrideForBus #mcbrideforbusiness #3lawsofempowerment

Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/mcbrideforbusiness/?fref=ts

Goldman Sachs 10,000 Small Business Program Helped My Business And It Can Help You

Posted on: December 12th, 2016 by R. Shawn McBride No Comments

If you’re like us, you’re probably a growing company. I on behalf of the R. Shawn McBride Law Firm, P.L.L.C. (www.mcbrideattorneys.com) attended the Goldman Sachs 10,000 Small Business Program. I was in Cohort 3 in Dallas, Texas, graduating in August of 2015. I found the program to be very valuable, both during the program and afterwards. Let’s look at why.

#1 You get to evaluate your business with other business owners. I was placed in a cohort with other business owners, and we all worked together to improve our businesses and our plans. We shared stories and commonalities and we learned from each other. You’re working with truly experienced business people that were also running businesses, because of the Goldman Sachs screening process.

#2 The curriculum was fantastic. It is written by Babson College and Goldman Sachs as part of their joint effort to create a wonderful program. The curriculum takes you through many different aspects of your business and gives you a chance to focus on different areas and learn and grow. The message here is, I was able to relay to others about who I am and what I do. I’ve also been able to help them grow and expand their networks, in the process. It’s really a case of working with the right people at the right time.

#3 It gives you access to a lot of different things. The Goldman Sachs program is a great opportunity to head into different avenues where you can expand your business.

What are your thoughts on the Goldman Sachs program? Have you done a similar program in the past? What has been your experience? What’s keeping you from joining a program like this? We’d love to see your comments below.

Make sure you download our free checklist to assess your business:  www.mcbrideforbusiness.com/BlogGift

This posting is intended to be a tool to familiarize readers with some of the issues discussed herein.  This is not meant to be a comprehensive discussion and additional details should be discussed with your attorneys, accountants, consultants, bankers and other business planners who can provide advice for your circumstances.  This article should not be treated as legal advice to any person or entity. Freeimages.com/photographer Hans-Gunther Dreyer.

 

About the Author

Shawn McBride is the Chief Innovation Officer at McBride For Business, LLC. His signature keynote, The 3 Laws of Empowerment (www.rshawnmcbridelive.com) , gives audiences an entertaining look at how they can prepare, plan and protect themselves. You can reach R. Shawn McBride at info@mcbrideforbusiness.com or (214) 418-0258.

Check us out on the web at www.mcbrideforbusiness.com , www.rshawnmcbridelive.com

Get Shawn’s latest book: www.mcbridebook.com

Add us on Twitter: @McBrideForBus #mcbrideforbusiness #3lawsofempowerment

Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/mcbrideforbusiness/?fref=ts

This is Our Time to be Empowered in Business

Posted on: December 10th, 2016 by R. Shawn McBride No Comments

R. Shawn McBride recently published an article to the R. Shawn McBride Law Firm, PLLC Blog on a topic that might be of interest: This is Our Time to be Empowered in Business.

He examines how each of us gets to choose what we will do with our waking hours. Many of those that came before us didn’t have the luxury of choice.

You can see the full article here.

This posting is intended to be a tool to familiarize readers with some of the issues discussed herein.  This is not meant to be a comprehensive discussion and additional details should be discussed with your attorneys, accountants, consultants, bankers and other business planners who can provide advice for your circumstances.  This article should not be treated as legal advice to any person or entity. Freeimages.com/photographer mimiliz.

Check us out on the web at www.mcbrideforbusiness.com , www.rshawnmcbridelive.com

Get Shawn’s latest book: www.mcbridebook.com

Add us on Twitter: @McBrideForBus #mcbrideforbusiness #3lawsofempowerment

Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/mcbrideforbusiness/?fref=ts

 

Transformation: It’s What You Are Selling

Posted on: December 9th, 2016 by R. Shawn McBride No Comments

If you’re in the sales business, you may be thinking about what your product is, what your service is, what the features or benefits are, but really, what you’re likely selling is a transformation. Your customer’s coming to you for a change, particularly within the service industry. You want to offer them a way to get from where they are to where they want to be, and your customers are going to be looking to you to deliver that change, that difference. They don’t necessarily care what you’re delivering. They don’t necessarily care how you’re delivering it. They want to get from point A to point B. They have a need.

Your job is to sell that transformation, that move from where you are or they are to where they need to be. Really, they don’t care about the process.

What’s been your experience with working with customers? How do you package yourself? What benefits do you offer? What transformation are you selling? Join us in the comments below.

Make sure you download our free checklist to assess your business:  www.mcbrideforbusiness.com/BlogGift

This posting is intended to be a tool to familiarize readers with some of the issues discussed herein.  This is not meant to be a comprehensive discussion and additional details should be discussed with your attorneys, accountants, consultants, bankers and other business planners who can provide advice for your circumstances.  This article should not be treated as legal advice to any person or entity. Freeimages.com/photographer Se hui Kim.

About the Author

Shawn McBride is the Chief Innovation Officer at McBride For Business, LLC. His signature keynote, The 3 Laws of Empowerment (www.rshawnmcbridelive.com) , gives audiences an entertaining look at how they can prepare, plan and protect themselves. You can reach R. Shawn McBride at info@mcbrideforbusiness.com or (214) 418-0258.

 

Check us out on the web at www.mcbrideforbusiness.com , www.rshawnmcbridelive.com

Get Shawn’s latest book: www.mcbridebook.com

Add us on Twitter: @McBrideForBus #mcbrideforbusiness #3lawsofempowerment

Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/mcbrideforbusiness/?fref=ts

What Happens To Your Business If Something Happens To You?

Posted on: December 9th, 2016 by R. Shawn McBride No Comments

It’s a simple enough question. What happens to your business if something happens to you? How does your business continue? If you’re a single-owner, single-employee business, I guess that means your business will shut down, unless you have sufficient processes and procedures in place and have a way of transitioning that business to somebody that can follow through.

At my law firm, when we set up companies, we often ask them if they want to have a backup manager, somebody who can step in and take over the business in the event something happens to the only owner. This is critical. This keeps the business alive and moving forward if the only owner is unable to perform their work. What are you doing in your business? What happens to your business? If you’re a bigger company, do you have a sufficient management team and others that are involved that are ready to take it over?

I’ve met with some businesses that have all their decision-making in a handful of people. One, two, or three people really control the entire business. This is a weak point. What if something happens to one of the people? What if something happens to two of those people?

I recently met with a company that had two key employees, who often traveled together and did things together. What happens if one of those trips has an unexpected problem? If they get injured, or disabled, or worse, die, what would happen to that business? After talking to them, the truth was revealed. They would be really hamstrung. Nobody would know what to do.

We played out the “what if” scenario. We found that employees would probably go running for the door because of the uncertainty. Key customers would probably disappear. The whole business could be shut down overnight just because of these two people because they don’t have a plan in place. We talked to them. We talked about the value of making a plan. We realized that if we put a plan in place, they could create more value. They could protect the value. They would have some certainty.

In the event of one of these unlikely events happening, employees would have your plan to look to for answers. They would feel like their job would continue. They would know the enterprise would continue. They would know they would get their paychecks.

Can you see how much that additional certainty is valuable to the business, how much that protects it for their families and their estates in the event something unfortunate would happen to these business owners? What are you doing to make your business bigger than you? What are you doing to make your business continue in the event something happens to you? Think about it.

Let us know what your experience has been in the comments below. Have you built a system for the possibility of you not being there or your business continuing without you? What if you’re disabled for a little while, and later need to come back to work? Would your business be completely disrupted and disappear? How would that feel? Let us know in the comments below. We’d like to discuss with you.

This posting is intended to be a tool to familiarize readers with some of the issues discussed herein.  This is not meant to be a comprehensive discussion and additional details should be discussed with your attorneys, accountants, consultants, bankers and other business planners who can provide advice for your circumstances.  This article should not be treated as legal advice to any person or entity. Freeimages.com/Milca Mulders.

About the Author

Shawn McBride is the Chief Innovation Officer at McBride For Business, LLC. He is a frequent speaker at events. His signature keynote, The 3 Laws of Empowerment (www.rshawnmcbridelive.com), gives audiences an entertaining look at how they can prepare, plan and protect themselves. You can reach R. Shawn McBride at info@mcbrideforbusiness.com or (214) 418-0258.

Check us out on the web at www.mcbrideforbusiness.com , www.rshawnmcbridelive.com

Get Shawn’s latest book: www.mcbridebook.com

Add us on Twitter: @McBrideForBus #mcbrideforbusiness  #3lawsofempowerment

Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/mcbrideforbusiness/?fref=ts

Expect The Unexpected And What To Do About It

Posted on: December 8th, 2016 by R. Shawn McBride No Comments

Unexpected things are going to happen. Read that again. Think about that. Things that you don’t expect are going to happen. There’s a lot of stuff that’s possible in this world and a lot of randomness, and things that we aren’t anticipating are going to happen, so we need to have system in place and procedures to get us through those times.

By definition, unexpected things are things that we’re not planning on. These are things that could happen. We want to have contingencies in place . . . but we don’t know exactly what’s going to happen and when. We need to know how to get through an unexpected path.

Systems are critical. When things are good, when things are going the way they should be, we should be investing time and energy to understand the processes we’re using, to document them, to make sure that they’re followed repeatedly, to make sure that our teams are working in unison on a set process. This allows us to deal much better with the unexpected. We can transfer a documented process from one staff member to another. We can bring somebody in to do a documented process.

If your head becomes cloudy because of the unexpected, you can still follow a system and procedure if you know where you’re going and how you’re doing it. Those systems will see you through. We don’t even need to discuss all the other benefits of systems such as allowing improvement, allowing processes to be evaluated, and figuring out our weak points. These are all great values of systems as well, but you really also want to have the systems in place in case something unexpected happens so that you can get through it, so you can manage the disruption, so you can get to the next level.

What’s been your experience with implementing systems? Do you currently have sufficient systems in place? Where are your weak points? What could you do better? Join us in the discussion below.

This posting is intended to be a tool to familiarize readers with some of the issues discussed herein.  This is not meant to be a comprehensive discussion and additional details should be discussed with your attorneys, accountants, consultants, bankers and other business planners who can provide advice for your circumstances.  This article should not be treated as legal advice to any person or entity. Freeimages.com/Miguel Fonseca.

About the Author

Shawn McBride is the Chief Innovation Officer at McBride For Business, LLC. He is a frequent speaker at events. His signature keynote, The 3 Laws of Empowerment (www.rshawnmcbridelive.com), gives audiences an entertaining look at how they can prepare, plan and protect themselves. You can reach R. Shawn McBride at info@mcbrideforbusiness.com or (214) 418-0258.

Check us out on the web at www.mcbrideforbusiness.com , www.rshawnmcbridelive.com

Get Shawn’s latest book: www.mcbridebook.com

Add us on Twitter: @McBrideForBus #mcbrideforbusiness  #3lawsofempowerment

Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/mcbrideforbusiness/?fref=ts

 

Dear Texas

Posted on: December 8th, 2016 by R. Shawn McBride No Comments

Shawn McBride interviewed with Lorri Allen, on DEAR Texas Radio about his book, Business Blunder!: 10 Dangerous Business Mistakes and How to Protect Your Business so It Can Thrive! and other business issues on November 10, 2016.

You can find the full interview here:  https://soundcloud.com/deartexasradio/dear-texas-read-radio-show-95-r-shawn-mcbride

You can find the full interview here: Lorri Allen:  Hi, everybody, and welcome to Dear Texas Radio. This is Lorri, and our featured author today is somebody that I think you’re going to respect just as much as I’ve come to. His name is R. Shawn McBride and he’s an attorney, he’s a business consultant, he’s a CPA, and most importantly for us, he is a Texas author. His latest book is called Business Blunders!: 10 Dangerous Business Mistakes and How to Protect Your Business so It Can Thrive!

Hey, Shawn, how are you doing?

R. Shawn McBride: Hey, great. How are you doing, Lorri?

Lorri Allen:  Great, great. Well, we’re so proud to have you in our stable of authors. Tell us how you came up with the idea for Business Blunders.

R. Shawn McBride: It really started with my legal practice. I straddled the fence between being an attorney and a business strategist. I just had people keep coming to my office after they had got into situations. So, clients would show up, they’d had problems with their business, ended up turning into legal matters. And if some of these same types of issues keep coming up over and over again, wouldn’t it be great if we just put some of these down and give them to people when they started their businesses or when they were in the early stages of their business so they avoided problems before they happen? It became sort of a guide to business owners to avoid problems before they happen.

Lorri Allen:  Well, I thank you for doing something so altruistic. People can buy a copy of your book at http://books.txauthors.com/SearchResults.asp?Search=business+blunders&Submit= . Now, Shawn, some people have been in business for years and still haven’t done it right, so I think this book is good for anybody in business, don’t you?

R. Shawn McBride: Yeah, exactly. It is something where I’ve actually, as I’ve written it . . . several of my friends are business owners and people I’ve encountered along the way have read the book, and almost always they come back and say, “Wow, there’s something I’m missing. I’m not doing something quite right.” The book profiles ten specific things that we saw, and my experience with most business owners that have been in business for a while, they’re doing great on eight or nine of them and there’s usually one or two items where they say, “Wow, I could go back and put some more attention there,” and that’s where they spend their time and that’s where the value is.

Lorri Allen:  Is there any blunder that surprises folks?

R. Shawn McBride: One big one that’s surprises a lot of folks is the fact that just because you filed your LLC or just because you set up a corporation with the state doesn’t necessarily mean your personal assets are protected. You usually have to go one step beyond that, and most people don’t realize that it’s not just the mere filing with the state but it’s also actions you take after you file with the state that really creates that protection for your assets.

Lorri Allen:  Wow, you may have just saved some people their businesses and hundreds of thousands of dollars. Thank you. We’re talking with R. Shawn McBride and his book is Business Blunders! 10 Dangerous Business Mistakes and How to Protect Your Business, so It Can Thrive! I know we’ve got a lot of authors who listen to this and they can probably benefit from this book, too. They may not think of themselves as business owners but they really are. Any comments about that, Shawn?

R. Shawn McBride: That’s right. Writing a book is really a business activity for most people because you’ve got pieces of business there, you’re going to be creating it, you’re going to be marketing it, you’re going to be appearing in events, you’re going to be selling the book, so this is a business activity. You may not think, “Just because I wrote a book, I’m in business,” but this is a business activity.

Whether it makes sense to form a company or not really is going to depend on your situation and how you’re commercializing it, but there’s possible liability risk there. You know, if you say certain things in your books, they could possibly sue you based on that, or just being out there when you’re hosting an event for your book, maybe you have some risks there as well.

Lorri Allen:  Yeah, yeah. Shawn, you’re such a busy guy, you’re an attorney and you’re also just getting a great speaking business going. How did you find time to write your book?

R. Shawn McBride: Yeah, I just made an intentional effort. It was one of those things where I wanted to do it. I thought about it for a while, I wanted to get something out there to help people, and I just stopped and I made time every day for a period of time. I didn’t stop my business to do it, but every day I made sure I put intentional effort and time into writing the book. Some days were more productive than others, as I heard other authors say how their experience was, as well. Once I started making time for it, the book really came together.

Lorri Allen:  That’s great advice. That really is helpful. Well, I know you’re writing another book, and maybe you’ve already finished it since we last talked, and you’re also doing speeches on this topic, it’s called The 3 Laws of Empowerment. Can you tell us a little bit about that?

R. Shawn McBride: Sure. The 3 Laws of Empowerment is something we’ve created based on my breath of experience, working with so many business owners over the years and looking at it from a different perspective. This is not just a pure nuts-and-bolts legal of how do we protect the business owner but how do we get the goals? How do we build companies that are bigger than the owner that are going to stand the test of time? It’s really about making plans and achieving dreams. The 3 Laws of Empowerment is a framework for looking for where are you in your goal-setting process, what are you doing to make your plans work, and how are you protecting yourself?

We’ve brought it all together into these principles which comes together in a lovely keynote which has been very popular with audiences. Now we’re working on a book that really goes into some of these concepts in a little more in-depth than I can cover in a typical keynote speech.

Lorri Allen:  That’s exciting. Now, Shawn, I have to ask you, we think of lawyers as very smart guys, sure, and smart women, and we think of CPAs as very detail-oriented. What do you like about writing and speaking?

R. Shawn McBride: It’s an education process for me. Personally, I like being an educator and it’s something that I think was buried inside of me for many years, and I’d kind of forgotten this side of me that I like working with people and I like teaching, and speaking and writing gives me an opportunity to teach people, to expose them to concepts and ideas, and so that’s the thing that really works for me and that’s why I enjoy it so much.

Lorri Allen:  Can you tell us a story about somebody, a client perhaps, that you’ve helped either avoid one of these business blunders or given them some empowerment and it really made a difference for them?

R. Shawn McBride: Yeah, I’ve had clients. I had a person that was an employee of mine who read The 3 Laws of Empowerment draft, which hasn’t been out to the public yet, but based on that, they made major life decisions on how they were going to change their path, how they were going to look at life differently. It’s funny, I’ve only shown that draft of The 3 Laws of Empowerment book to a handful of people, but I’ve had a couple people come back and say that they’ve got a new perspective on life and how they’re going to analyze situations and how they’re going to make decisions in their life, and that’s so fun, just to know that we’re giving people a framework to look at things differently and make better decisions in their life. That’s what’s so exciting about The 3 Laws of Empowerment.

Lorri Allen:  Yeah, and that must be so fulfilling for you.

R. Shawn McBride: It feels great. It’s just fun and these lessons have come together from so many people. I’ve learned from a community of my clients and experiences, some of my personal experiences that I’ve grown my business. Yes, it’s rewarding to be able to help others get what they want to achieve and to think better about their goals and their process of achieving their goals. That’s really making a difference in people’s lives. It’s kind of the unintended consequence of my career. I never thought that I knew I’d be helping people and I knew the law side of me would be beneficial to business people and I would make a difference there, but to be fundamentally changing how people live their lives is a way I never thought that my career or life would go, but it’s such a fun thing to do.

Lorri Allen:  That’s huge. That really is. Well, we know people can get your Business Blunders book at http://books.txauthors.com/SearchResults.asp?Search=business+blunders&Submit= , but if they want to hire you to speak or find out more about The 3 Laws of Empowerment, you’ve got several websites, which one is the best one for that?

R. Shawn McBride: They could go to www.rshawnmcbridelive.com/3laws and Shawn is spelled S-H-A-W-N. That profiles me as a speaker and has specific materials talking about The 3 Laws of Empowerment. That website is really geared to explaining the speeches that we give and what that’s about. If you’re interested in the speech of The 3 Laws of Empowerment specifically, that’s the site I could encourage people to go to.

Lorri Allen:  You know, in interest of full disclosure, I have heard Shawn speak and I’ve definitely read Business Blunders, and I can highly recommend him. If you just stumbled upon us, this is DEAR Texas Radio, and that is an acronym, that DEAR part. We urge you to Drop Everything And Read, so we hope that you will do that. Today, our featured author is R. Shawn McBride. He’s an attorney, an author, a speaker, a CPA, and he wants to help people not make business mistakes.

Shawn, you were talking about The 3 Laws of Empowerment, and I know you started doing something called The 3 Laws of Empowerment for High Growth Companies. What does that mean?

R. Shawn McBride: Yes, that’s the new versions of The 3 Laws of Empowerment. Again, an outgrowth of the principles of The 3 Laws of Empowerment, which are originally geared to businesses and business owners. People started saying, “What about my employees? What about my staff? Can they use the principles of doing intentional planning and building careers at work?” That’s how we came up with the idea of The 3 Laws of Empowerment for High Growth Companies. We’ve taken the core message, the core three laws of preparing, planning, and protecting, and now allowing employees to apply them to their careers.

There’s forward-thinking companies that are really looking to grow and know the key to their growth is having empowered employees that are doing things that are great for both the employee and the company. This is now a message that they can use as part of their corporate training program.

Lorri Allen:  You know, Shawn, I know because you and I have talked, that you’re not just a nose-to-the-grindstone all the time. You do have an interesting hobby of, is it restoring classic cars or is it just buying them and driving them?

R. Shawn McBride: Well, I like classic cars. I like doing engine work and mechanical work, I can keep the brakes and do the maintenance and stuff. I’m probably not your best body guy. The latest antique car I bought, I had somebody going over the body and doing that kind of work, but I do enjoy working on them and keeping them up and doing the maintenance on them. The painting body work I have to get from somebody else because I think they do a much better job than I ever could.

Lorri Allen:  Well, you’re very specific. There’s a very specific era and kind of car that you like. Do you want to tell us about your latest car?

R. Shawn McBride: Yeah. I recently got a ’70 Dodge Challenger Convertible. It’s really historical. Back in high school I drove my father’s ’70 Challenger Hardtop, one of my friends fell in love with it. Fast forward many years later and he calls me up one day and says, “I have a car that you need to buy,” and lo and behold it’s this ’70 Challenger Convertible. I always like convertibles. Of course, my father had a ’70 Challenger Hardtop, and now I’ve got a convertible version of it, and it’s in purple, the color that I always wanted my father to paint his car. It was a strange combination of things that all just came together.

Lorri Allen:  That sounds like fun. I’m glad that you actually do something for fun now and then.

R. Shawn McBride: Yeah, you’ve got to take a break from the work.

Lorri Allen:  Well, I just think you’re the kind of guy that probably thinks that doing all this business stuff is fun. Would that be fair to say?

R. Shawn McBride: It is very interesting to me. I don’t feel like I’m working. I often tell people I watch Facebook and Twitter and people are like, “Oh, my god, it’s Sunday. I’ve got to go back to work tomorrow. Now it’s Monday, I’m dreading it.” Wednesday we’re getting half way through the week, Friday they start celebrating. For me, my week isn’t like that. I enjoy the weekend and I do some different things on the weekend, but I don’t dread Monday coming because there’s things I want to do and there’s things I want to be engaged in. I’m very lucky that way.

Lorri Allen:  That’s great. Well, I think it’s about time for us to take a break, Shawn, so we’ll talk more about what you do in just a minute.

R. Shawn McBride: Sounds great.

Welcome to DEAR Texas Radio where we encourage Texans to Drop Everything And Read (DEAR). Your hostess for today’s show is Lorri Allen.

Lorri Allen:  Hi and welcome back. So, glad you can be with us. We are talking to R. Shawn McBride. He is the author of Business Blunders!: 10 Dangerous Business Mistakes and How to Protect Your Business so It Can Thrive! Of course, you can find that at http://books.txauthors.com/SearchResults.asp?Search=business+blunders&Submit=, and we are just so excited about all the authors that we have there and all the books, but Shawn, you’re a special guy, so not only are you writing books to help people, but you’re also having fun doing it.

I happen to know that your legal practice specializes in partnerships. What are some of the problems that you can have in a business partnership?

R. Shawn McBride: Well, a lot of it is the lack of planning. A lot of people get very excited about the business opportunities that partnerships are going to present. They’re moving forward and they find their partner. Maybe it’s somebody they know when the business idea comes to them or somebody they’ve known for years and they move forward. Then life happens. We spent a lot of time with our clients early in the process to protect the wealth that they’re going to be creating, to make sure that regardless of what happens in the business, regardless of what happens with the partnership, they’re going to be safe, they’re going to be protected and that wealth is going to be there.

We put planning in the beginning. We know life is going to change and we know very, very rarely do both partners want to enter the business or multiple partners want to exit the business at the same time, so we start planning early on to make sure everybody gets their fair share out of the wealth creation, and then there won’t be problems down the road.

Lorri Allen:  Kind of like a prenup? Is that what you’re talking about?

R. Shawn McBride: It’s kind of like a business prenup, and it’s not in the negative standpoint of saying, “Hey, we’re not going to get along.” It’s recognizing that life’s going to change. At some point, probably one of the partners is going to want to go into a different business, they may want to pick up a second side business, they may want to change their hour allocation, they may have their values shift because of certain family events or other things outside of the business.

We just know as human beings, that over the course of three, five, or ten years, people’s view of the partnership is going to change. One of them might want to get out of it in five years and move on to a completely unrelated project. One of them may want to double down and make the business their passion. We just build the flexibility in early on to make sure everybody’s economically taken care of regardless of what future decisions we make. It’s kind of like a prenup but it’s more about just building flexibility into the arrangement so that everybody can follow their life path as that evolves.

Lorri Allen:  You know, that sounds really smart because I think you have some horror stories or maybe there’s some headlines in the news where a partner will get a divorce or die suddenly, and all of a sudden, the wrong person is running the business.

R. Shawn McBride: Unfortunately, yes, we’ve seen that. Divorce has been a big one. We talk often in terms of the four Ds with our clients. Anytime our clients come in there, we analyze what we’ll do with these four Ds situations: Death, disability, divorce, and disagreement, and you just hit on two of the four Ds which is divorce or death. We’ve had times where people have had a divorce and then the ex-spouse becomes an ex-owner of the business, and some starts asking a lot of questions. Is the money being spent properly? Why am I not getting a dividend? Why are you paying that much rent? Is this a fair business deal you arranged with this third party that you signed an agreement with?

It starts putting a lot of trouble in the water and it’s hard to get two ex-spouses to agree, so if you have a divorce and you don’t do some advanced planning, you’re going to have two ex-spouses that are both owners of your business. That can be an ugly situation. Yes, we have unfortunately seen a couple of horror stories with that. Similarly, with death. Somebody dies and then their spouse or children show up at the business and say, “Okay, I’m an owner now. I’d like to exercise my rights. I’d like to come to the next board meeting,” and that can be awkward for the remaining partners.

Lorri Allen:  Yeah, that’s probably a nice way to put it.

R. Shawn McBride: Yeah.

Lorri Allen:  Go ahead.

R. Shawn McBride: I’m just saying, yeah, that “awkward” is not the word that most of the people showing up in our office would say. They usually use much more emotional words.

Lorri Allen:  What about people who just … I hate to say ignorant or naïve of how to build their business, but they make some of these blunders just because they don’t know better, and they’re leaving money on the table. Is that fair to say?

R. Shawn McBride: Yeah, that’s often the case. The partners come in with the best of intentions and they want to build a business, but then they find out that they didn’t do the planning and now they’ve got a problem. They didn’t think that they would end up here. They thought that they were going into business with their best friend and now they’ve agreed that they want to go separate ways, but one of them wants one number and the other one wants twice as much money.

Lorri Allen:  You know, Shawn, I think some people are scared to come to an attorney like you just to maybe check and see if their business is okay or to start a business. I think they’re scared to death that attorneys are going to cost them an arm and a leg, maybe money they don’t have. You and I think other attorneys offer free consultations or have information on your website. Tell us a little bit more about that.

R. Shawn McBride: There’s a lot of information available in our law firm’s blogs. If you go to www.mcbrideattorneys.com, which is our law firm website, there’s a blog there. We write about a lot of these issues, so you can educate yourself a lot on this stuff in advance and figure out some of the issues you might want to be looking at. The traditional attorney is going to charge you some legal fees if you do come in here to build one of these and do one of these correctly. But the cost of that compared to the amounts that litigation might cost you later on, unfortunately, we’ve had partners who have had to walk away from partnerships because the economic value of the partnership was less than what the cost of litigating over the partnership would have been. Those kinds of losses are big, compared to some legal costs you could put into planning early on. It’s usually smart money up front to get these things right sooner than later.

Lorri Allen:  Yeah. Look at it as an investment. We are talking with Shawn McBride. His book that you can find at http://books.txauthors.com/SearchResults.asp?Search=business+blunders&Submit= Business Blunders!: 10 Dangerous Business Mistakes and How to Protect Your Business so It Can Thrive! Shawn is also, in addition to being at attorney and a business consultant, he is a speaker. He’s writing another book about The 3 Laws of Empowerment.

Oh, this programming note: Starting after the first of the year, we are going to have something that you’re going to want to pay attention to and listen for, because we’re going to allow you to win, or maybe incentivize you to listen, we’re going to give you the opportunity to win a book from the author who we are interviewing. That’s kind of exciting. Something new here at DEAR Texas Radio.

Well, Shawn, if you had to give some tips or suggestions or advice about how to build companies that last, what would you say?

R. Shawn McBride: I’d say it’s a lot of intentional planning, it’s being realistic early on, that whatever plan you have is probably not going to go exactly the way you thought. Then you need to be flexible, you need to build flexibility into your ownership, into your structure, knowing that some of your partners may leave before others, your partners may have different views on when the right time to sell the company is. Just knowing that you’re going to have things evolve along the way that you haven’t exactly planned for, you can start laying a foundation so that when these things happen later, you have the flexibility to adapt the business and evolve the business. That’s one of the keys.

Then for some companies, people in a single-owner situation or a maturing ownership group, you may want to start putting plans in place for how do you transition the business? How do you get other people involved in case something happens to the only owner? How do we keep that business moving forward to protect that economic value?

Lorri Allen:  Well, how do you leave a legacy?

R. Shawn McBride: How do you leave a legacy? Unfortunately, I’ve had these conversations with some business owners, and a lot of them say, “Well, if something happens to me, I get in an auto accident or, for whatever reason, I’m unable to come to work for a week,” here’s your star salesperson suddenly circulating their resume and out the back door because they’re not going to sit around to see if the company does okay without the owner coming to work for a week or two. It’s that narrow of a margin, there’s that kind of risk there. We can build stuff in the management structure and in the legal structure of the company to make sure that the company is very stable, we can communicate that to the employees, and that does a lot to protect that value for the owner’s family or other heirs to make sure there’s something there to leave behind.

Lorri Allen:  Yeah. You know, Shawn, I teach crisis communications, and I tell people, “It’s not if something horrible or bad is going to happen to you, it’s when, and that you need to be prepared.” Sounds like the same sort of principle for just planning and structuring your business.

R. Shawn McBride: Exactly. We know life. We know unexpected things are going to happen in life. All of us has had things we haven’t planned on happen one day. We get news that something happened that we never thought was possible or we didn’t think was likely to happen to us. These things, unfortunately, are going to happen. Now, what’s the plan? How do you make sure that your business continues? How do you make sure that it’s still there for your employees? How do you make sure that that wealth’s still there for your family? How do you keep that rolling forward? That’s where we jump in with our clients and do the “what ifs” and figure out how we do that.

Lorri Allen:  Those are all such good goals to have. It’s not like you’re just being greedy, it’s you’re contributing to the economy, you’re making a way for your family, you’re doing something worthwhile. It’s not anything bad to build your business or build a company that lasts.

R. Shawn McBride: That’s right. I’ve worked with so many business owners over the years. Usually, at some point, the business owners – they want to keep some wealth for their family, they want to make sure that their children, their spouse are protected, maybe some extended family. They also want to protect their employees. Particularly small and medium-sized businesses, people that stick around for long-term.

You’re creating jobs, you’re helping people live their lives, and so many business owners want to protect the business for those people too. Some of this intentional planning can help protect that greater constituency when you build it correctly. A lot of our business owners want to make sure that the business lasts, not just to get the money to their spouse or children, but to make sure their employees still have a place to go to work too, so their lives aren’t disrupted.

Lorri Allen:  That’s great. Well, Shawn, as you can tell, cares. Shawn, we’ve just got about 30 seconds left. You’ve given us several websites. We know we can buy Business Blunders at http://books.txauthors.com/SearchResults.asp?Search=business+blunders&Submit=, but remind us of the website to maybe get you as a speaker or to get some of your legal services. How do we find you?

R. Shawn McBride: For speaking, www.rshawnmcbridelive.com/3laws. Shawn is spelled S-H-A-W-N. For legal work, www.mcbrideattorneys.com.

Lorri Allen:  Great. Probably any of those, even if we got to a different website, we could still contact you and say, “Hey, help.”

R. Shawn McBride: Exactly. We’ll get it sorted out if you can get ahold of me. www.rshawnmcbridelive.com/3laws. Letter R, S-H-A-W-N.

Lorri Allen:  Shawn, you sound like just such a nice guy that you’re the kind of attorney that I would want to have, so I appreciate you writing this book and being with us today on DEAR Texas Radio.

R. Shawn McBride: Thank you. I really enjoyed it.

Lorri Allen:  Good, good. Well, that’s R. Shawn McBride, and again, the book is Business Blunders!: 10 Dangerous Business Mistakes and How to Protect Your Business so It Can Thrive! You may not think of what you do as a business, but hey, if you make a living from it, it is a business.

Well, I’m Lorri Allen. I’m also a Texas author and so proud to be a part of this organization. DEAR Texas Radio, Drop Everything And Read. Until next time, read as often as you can, it will just make you smarter, and buy as many books as you can afford. Thanks for being with us.

Make sure you download our free checklist to assess your business:  www.mcbrideforbusiness.com/BlogGift

This posting is intended to be a tool to familiarize readers with some of the issues discussed herein.  This is not meant to be a comprehensive discussion and additional details should be discussed with your attorneys, accountants, consultants, bankers and other business planners who can provide advice for your circumstances. Each case is unique.  Past results do not guarantee future outcomes. This article should not be treated as legal advice to any person or entity. Freeimages.com/photographer Cheryl Empey.

Shawn McBride is the Chief Innovation Officer at McBride For Business, LLC. His signature keynote, The 3 Laws of Empowerment (www.rshawnmcbridelive.com/3laws), gives audiences an entertaining look at how they can prepare, plan and protect themselves. You can reach R. Shawn McBride at info@mcbrideforbusiness.com or (214) 418-0258.

You can reach Lorri Allen at DEAR Radio at 214-878-8610.

 

Check us out on the web at www.mcbrideforbusiness.com, www.rshawnmcbridelive.com/3laws

Get Shawn’s latest book: www.mcbridebook.com

Add us on Twitter: @McBrideForBus #McbrideForBusiness #3LawsofEmpowerment

Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/mcbrideforbusiness/?fref=ts

Seven Things To Do Now To Protect Yourself

Posted on: December 7th, 2016 by R. Shawn McBride No Comments

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We talk in The Three Laws of Empowerment about preparing, planning, and protecting (www.rshawnmcbridelive.com). If you’re reading this, you’re probably thinking about how do you protect yourself. Here’s a list of seven ways to help protect yourself.

#1 Look at where you are. Where are you at now? What are your assets? What’s your inventory looking like? What do you have in your favor? What would you want to make sure you have in the future? What’s of value to you?

#2 Where are your weak spots? Now that you’ve determine what’s of value to you, which one of these are at risk? What’s under insured? Where do you not have contingency planning? Where could things go wrong?

# 3 Do “what if” testing. What if certain things happen? What if things evolve? How will you move forward? Start testing what if on various scenarios and risks to make sure that you understand how things will happen and make sure that you understand the risks.

# 4 Get others involved. You want to have others take a look at it. It may be an insurance professional, who has had years of experience in the industry, or other business owners or advisers who can look over your shoulder and tell you where to focus your time and attention.

# 5 Build solutions to real problems. Now that you understand where the risks are, start thinking about solutions and how you can close some of these “what if” contingencies. What processes and procedures can you put in place? How can you evaluate your management structure? How can you make sure that your company is going to stand the test of time? Start building solutions to these problems.

# 6 Implement. Start putting these solutions in place. Start understanding how you’re going to get from here to there and what the process is.

# 7 Revise and update. Rarely do these things go in a direct line. You’re going to have multiple things to get done. Revise and update your protection plans as you go along. Revisit occasionally where you’re at. Work back through this seven-step process and make sure you know where you’re going.

What’s been your process of protecting yourself? Do you feel like you are prepared for the unexpected? What will you do differently in the future? Join us in the comments below.

Build solutions.

Plan for the unexpected.

Make sure you download our free checklist to assess your business:  www.mcbrideforbusiness.com/BlogGift

 

This posting is intended to be a tool to familiarize readers with some of the issues discussed herein.  This is not meant to be a comprehensive discussion and additional details should be discussed with your attorneys, accountants, consultants, bankers and other business planners who can provide advice for your circumstances. Each case is unique.  Past results do not guarantee future outcomes. This article should not be treated as legal advice to any person or entity. Freeimages.com/photographer Marsy.

 

About the Author

Shawn McBride is the Chief Innovation Officer at McBride For Business, LLC. His signature keynote, The 3 Laws of Empowerment (www.rshawnmcbridelive.com), gives audiences an entertaining look at how they can prepare, plan and protect themselves. You can reach R. Shawn McBride at info@mcbrideforbusiness.com or (214) 418-0258.

 

Check us out on the web at www.mcbrideforbusiness.com, www.rshawnmcbridelive.com

Get Shawn’s latest book: www.mcbridebook.com

Add us on Twitter: @McBrideForBus #mcbrideforbusiness #3lawsofempowerment

Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/mcbrideforbusiness/?fref=ts

 

Seven Things To Do Now To Plan

Posted on: December 6th, 2016 by R. Shawn McBride No Comments

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Planning is key and it’s always wise to be getting ready for better and better things. How do you do the planning process? We spend a lot of time helping people plan and I often speak about planning in The Three Laws of Empowerment (www.rshawnmcbridelive.com). Here’s some steps to help you work through the planning process:

# 1 Evaluate where you are. Think about where stand now. What is your current situation? What skills, assets, and abilities do you have in your inventory? What can you utilize in the future?

# 2 Look at your current plan. What plans do you have in place now, written or unwritten? What are you aiming for? Where are things headed? Take a look at the current plan to assess what’s going on.

# 3 Confirm your goals. Where are you headed with your business? What do you want to do in the future? What dreams are you trying to accomplish?

# 4 Determine what’s realistic. Looking at your goals, set some realistic things that you can plan to achieve and focus your attention there.

# 5 Look for weak spots. Where are the problems? What are the issues? How could your plan not come together? What would cause a disruption? Think about your weak spots that you can strengthen.

# 6 Put milestones and a timeline in writing. Now you want to update your plan and figure out how you’re going to get there. What are you going to accomplish, by what deadline? How is this process going to unfold and how are you going to work this plan over time?

# 7 Reevaluate and adjust. Go back periodically and look at your plan. Determine how it’s going. See where the problems are. Keep things moving forward.

What’s been your experience with plans? Have you struggled with this in the past? What will you do differently in the future? Join us in the comments below.

Focus on realistic goals.

Have written timelines to help you reach your goals.

 

Make sure you download our free checklist to assess your business:  www.mcbrideforbusiness.com/BlogGift

 

This posting is intended to be a tool to familiarize readers with some of the issues discussed herein.  This is not meant to be a comprehensive discussion and additional details should be discussed with your attorneys, accountants, consultants, bankers and other business planners who can provide advice for your circumstances. Each case is unique.  Past results do not guarantee future outcomes. This article should not be treated as legal advice to any person or entity. Freeimages.com/photographer typofi.

 

About the Author

Shawn McBride is the Chief Innovation Officer at McBride For Business, LLC. His signature keynote, The 3 Laws of Empowerment (www.rshawnmcbridelive.com), gives audiences an entertaining look at how they can prepare, plan and protect themselves. You can reach R. Shawn McBride at info@mcbrideforbusiness.com or (214) 418-0258.

 

Check us out on the web at www.mcbrideforbusiness.com, www.rshawnmcbridelive.com

Get Shawn’s latest book: www.mcbridebook.com

Add us on Twitter: @McBrideForBus #mcbrideforbusiness #3lawsofempowerment

Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/mcbrideforbusiness/?fref=ts

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